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Title: Replacing Metal-Based Lightning Strike Protection Layer of CFRPS by 3D Printed Electronically Conductive Polymer Layer

Abstract

Electrically conductive adhesive layers were deposited on top of aerospace grade carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a small-scale 3D printer. Polylactic acid (PLA) filaments with copper filler (CU-PLA) and graphene filler (GO-PLA) were used to print around 0.7 mm thick electrically conductive layer on top of CFRP panels. 3D printed polymeric layers were tested for their effectiveness as a lightning strike protection (LSP) material by subjected to a simulated lightning strike. A painted, electrically non-conductive unprotected panel was also tested for comparison. In the case of the CU-PLA protected sample, a high electrical conductivity proved to be useful in fast dissipation of the lightning current. Fast current dissipation helped to reduce the resistive heating after a lightning strike. Thermography and high-speed camera analysis were employed to study the heat generation and current dissipation during the lightning strike. These results established that a useful Faraday Cage was applied via additive manufacturing successfully. This work shows the successful application of 3D printing for producing LSP technologies, with future work aimed at investigating optimal printable electrically conductive thermoset material candidates.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1569381
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: The Composites and Advanced Materials Expo (CAMX 2019) - Anaheim, California, United States of America - 9/23/2019 4:00:00 PM-9/26/2019 4:00:00 PM
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kumar, Vipin, Smith, Tyler, Condon, Justin, Yeole, Pritesh S., Hassen, Ahmed, and Kunc, Vlastimil. Replacing Metal-Based Lightning Strike Protection Layer of CFRPS by 3D Printed Electronically Conductive Polymer Layer. United States: N. p., 2019. Web.
Kumar, Vipin, Smith, Tyler, Condon, Justin, Yeole, Pritesh S., Hassen, Ahmed, & Kunc, Vlastimil. Replacing Metal-Based Lightning Strike Protection Layer of CFRPS by 3D Printed Electronically Conductive Polymer Layer. United States.
Kumar, Vipin, Smith, Tyler, Condon, Justin, Yeole, Pritesh S., Hassen, Ahmed, and Kunc, Vlastimil. Sun . "Replacing Metal-Based Lightning Strike Protection Layer of CFRPS by 3D Printed Electronically Conductive Polymer Layer". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1569381.
@article{osti_1569381,
title = {Replacing Metal-Based Lightning Strike Protection Layer of CFRPS by 3D Printed Electronically Conductive Polymer Layer},
author = {Kumar, Vipin and Smith, Tyler and Condon, Justin and Yeole, Pritesh S. and Hassen, Ahmed and Kunc, Vlastimil},
abstractNote = {Electrically conductive adhesive layers were deposited on top of aerospace grade carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a small-scale 3D printer. Polylactic acid (PLA) filaments with copper filler (CU-PLA) and graphene filler (GO-PLA) were used to print around 0.7 mm thick electrically conductive layer on top of CFRP panels. 3D printed polymeric layers were tested for their effectiveness as a lightning strike protection (LSP) material by subjected to a simulated lightning strike. A painted, electrically non-conductive unprotected panel was also tested for comparison. In the case of the CU-PLA protected sample, a high electrical conductivity proved to be useful in fast dissipation of the lightning current. Fast current dissipation helped to reduce the resistive heating after a lightning strike. Thermography and high-speed camera analysis were employed to study the heat generation and current dissipation during the lightning strike. These results established that a useful Faraday Cage was applied via additive manufacturing successfully. This work shows the successful application of 3D printing for producing LSP technologies, with future work aimed at investigating optimal printable electrically conductive thermoset material candidates.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {9}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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