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Title: Fuel-Lubricant Interactions on the Propensity for Stochastic Pre-Ignition

Abstract

This work explores the impact of the interaction of lubricant and fuel properties on the propensity for stochastic pre-ignition (SPI). Findings are based on statistically significant changes in SPI tendency and magnitude, as determined by measurements of cylinder pressure. Specifically, lubricant detergents, lubricant volatility, fuel volatility, fuel chemical composition, fuel-wall impingement, and engine load were varied to study the physical and chemical effects of fuel-lubricant interactions on SPI tendency. The work illustrates that at low loads, with fuels susceptible to SPI events, lubricant detergent package effects on SPI were non-significant. However, with changes to fuel distillation, fuel-wall impingement, and most importantly engine load, lubricant detergent effects could be observed even at reduced loads This suggests that there is a thermal effect associated with the higher load operation. It was hypothesized that the thermal effect was associated with lube oil nitrogenation. To test this theory, nitromethane (CH3NO2) was blended at 6.5% by volume CH3NO2 resulted in significant sensitivity to lubricant additive package effect on SPI, even at reduced loads where no lubricant sensitivity was observed without the addition of CH3NO2. The combined results highlight the interplay of fuel-lubricant interaction on SPI events, but more importantly suggest that there is the potentialmore » of a chemical interaction unique to high-load engine operation that results in reactive chemical processes, such as nitration, where lubricant chemistry becomes an active pathway for SPI activity.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B); USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
OSTI Identifier:
1568044
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-5400-75000
DOE Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the 14th International Conference on Engines & Vehicles, 15-19 September 2019, Naples, Italy
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; lubricant additives; lubricating oils; lubricants; knock; engine cylinders

Citation Formats

Zigler, Bradley T, and Luecke, Jon H. Fuel-Lubricant Interactions on the Propensity for Stochastic Pre-Ignition. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.4271/2019-24-0103.
Zigler, Bradley T, & Luecke, Jon H. Fuel-Lubricant Interactions on the Propensity for Stochastic Pre-Ignition. United States. doi:10.4271/2019-24-0103.
Zigler, Bradley T, and Luecke, Jon H. Mon . "Fuel-Lubricant Interactions on the Propensity for Stochastic Pre-Ignition". United States. doi:10.4271/2019-24-0103.
@article{osti_1568044,
title = {Fuel-Lubricant Interactions on the Propensity for Stochastic Pre-Ignition},
author = {Zigler, Bradley T and Luecke, Jon H},
abstractNote = {This work explores the impact of the interaction of lubricant and fuel properties on the propensity for stochastic pre-ignition (SPI). Findings are based on statistically significant changes in SPI tendency and magnitude, as determined by measurements of cylinder pressure. Specifically, lubricant detergents, lubricant volatility, fuel volatility, fuel chemical composition, fuel-wall impingement, and engine load were varied to study the physical and chemical effects of fuel-lubricant interactions on SPI tendency. The work illustrates that at low loads, with fuels susceptible to SPI events, lubricant detergent package effects on SPI were non-significant. However, with changes to fuel distillation, fuel-wall impingement, and most importantly engine load, lubricant detergent effects could be observed even at reduced loads This suggests that there is a thermal effect associated with the higher load operation. It was hypothesized that the thermal effect was associated with lube oil nitrogenation. To test this theory, nitromethane (CH3NO2) was blended at 6.5% by volume CH3NO2 resulted in significant sensitivity to lubricant additive package effect on SPI, even at reduced loads where no lubricant sensitivity was observed without the addition of CH3NO2. The combined results highlight the interplay of fuel-lubricant interaction on SPI events, but more importantly suggest that there is the potential of a chemical interaction unique to high-load engine operation that results in reactive chemical processes, such as nitration, where lubricant chemistry becomes an active pathway for SPI activity.},
doi = {10.4271/2019-24-0103},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {9}
}

Conference:
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