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Title: Effects of sulfate on biotite interfacial reactions under high temperature and high CO 2 pressure

Abstract

To ensure the safety and efficiency of engineered subsurface operations, it is vital to understand impacts of aqueous chemistries on brine–mineral interactions in subsurface environments. In this study, using biotite as a model phyllosilicate, we investigated the effects of sulfate on its interfacial reactions under subsurface relevant conditions (95 °C and 102 atm of CO2). By making monodentate mononuclear complexes with biotite surface sites, 50 mM sulfate enhanced biotite dissolution by 40% compared to that without sulfate. However, sulfate at lower concentrations than 50 mM did not obviously affect biotite dissolution. In addition, sulfate did not impact secondary mineral precipitation. However, even without any discernible surface morphological change, sulfate adsorption made biotite surfaces more hydrophilic. To provide a more comprehensive perspective on environmentally-abundant ligands, we further comparatively examined the effects of various inorganic (e.g., sulfate and phosphate) and organic ligands (e.g., acetate, oxalate, and phosphonates) on biotite interfacial interactions and assessed their impacts on physico-chemical properties. We found that the presence of phosphate and phosphonates significantly promoted precipitation of Fe- and Al-bearing secondary minerals, but sulfate, acetate, and oxalate did not. Biotite surface wettability was also altered as a result of changes in biotite surface functional groups and surface chargesmore » by ligand adsorption: sulfate, oxalate, phosphate, and phosphonate made biotite more hydrophilic, while acetate made it less hydrophilic. This study provides useful new insights into the effects of brine chemistries on brine–mineral interactions, enabling safer and more efficient engineered subsurface operations.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Department of Energy, Environmental and Chemical Engineering; Washington University in St. Louis; St. Louis; USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (NCGC); Univ. of California, Oakland, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1566633
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics. PCCP (Print)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 1463-9076
Publisher:
Royal Society of Chemistry
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
bio-inspired, mechanical behavior, carbon sequestration

Citation Formats

Zhang, Lijie, Zhu, Yaguang, Wu, Xuanhao, and Jun, Young-Shin. Effects of sulfate on biotite interfacial reactions under high temperature and high CO 2 pressure. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1039/c8cp07368f.
Zhang, Lijie, Zhu, Yaguang, Wu, Xuanhao, & Jun, Young-Shin. Effects of sulfate on biotite interfacial reactions under high temperature and high CO 2 pressure. United States. doi:10.1039/c8cp07368f.
Zhang, Lijie, Zhu, Yaguang, Wu, Xuanhao, and Jun, Young-Shin. Tue . "Effects of sulfate on biotite interfacial reactions under high temperature and high CO 2 pressure". United States. doi:10.1039/c8cp07368f.
@article{osti_1566633,
title = {Effects of sulfate on biotite interfacial reactions under high temperature and high CO 2 pressure},
author = {Zhang, Lijie and Zhu, Yaguang and Wu, Xuanhao and Jun, Young-Shin},
abstractNote = {To ensure the safety and efficiency of engineered subsurface operations, it is vital to understand impacts of aqueous chemistries on brine–mineral interactions in subsurface environments. In this study, using biotite as a model phyllosilicate, we investigated the effects of sulfate on its interfacial reactions under subsurface relevant conditions (95 °C and 102 atm of CO2). By making monodentate mononuclear complexes with biotite surface sites, 50 mM sulfate enhanced biotite dissolution by 40% compared to that without sulfate. However, sulfate at lower concentrations than 50 mM did not obviously affect biotite dissolution. In addition, sulfate did not impact secondary mineral precipitation. However, even without any discernible surface morphological change, sulfate adsorption made biotite surfaces more hydrophilic. To provide a more comprehensive perspective on environmentally-abundant ligands, we further comparatively examined the effects of various inorganic (e.g., sulfate and phosphate) and organic ligands (e.g., acetate, oxalate, and phosphonates) on biotite interfacial interactions and assessed their impacts on physico-chemical properties. We found that the presence of phosphate and phosphonates significantly promoted precipitation of Fe- and Al-bearing secondary minerals, but sulfate, acetate, and oxalate did not. Biotite surface wettability was also altered as a result of changes in biotite surface functional groups and surface charges by ligand adsorption: sulfate, oxalate, phosphate, and phosphonate made biotite more hydrophilic, while acetate made it less hydrophilic. This study provides useful new insights into the effects of brine chemistries on brine–mineral interactions, enabling safer and more efficient engineered subsurface operations.},
doi = {10.1039/c8cp07368f},
journal = {Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics. PCCP (Print)},
issn = {1463-9076},
number = 12,
volume = 21,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {1}
}

Works referenced in this record:

Experimental and simulation studies on mineral trapping of CO2 with brine
journal, July 2004

  • Soong, Y.; Goodman, A. L.; McCarthy-Jones, J. R.
  • Energy Conversion and Management, Vol. 45, Issue 11-12, p. 1845-1859
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.enconman.2003.09.029