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Title: Extreme Events and Climate Adaptation-Mitigation Linkages: Understanding Low-Carbon Transitions in the Era of Global Urbanization

Abstract

It has become increasingly clear that cities will have to simultaneously undertake both adaptation and mitigation in response to accelerating climate change and the growing demands for meaningful climate action. Here we examine the connections between climate mitigation and climate adaptation, specifically, between low-carbon energy systems and extreme events. The article specifically addresses the question, how do responses to extreme climate risks enhance or limit capacity to promote city-level greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation? As a step toward answering this question, we present a framework for considering windows of opportunity that may arise as a result of extreme events and how these windows can be exploited to foster development and implementation of low-carbon energy strategies. Four brief case studies are used to provide empirical background and determine the impact of potential windows of opportunity. Some general conclusions are defined. In particular, the existing energy system structure is an important determinant of impact and potential for energy transitions. Well-developed and articulated governance strategies and ready access of effective and economically efficient alternative energy technology were key to transitions. However, prospects for inequity in development and implementation of low-carbon solutions need to be considered. Finally, exploiting windows of opportunity afforded by extreme eventsmore » for developing low-carbon economy and infrastructure also can provide resilience against those very events. These types of responses will be needed as extreme events increase in frequency and magnitude in the future, with cities as primary sites of impact and action.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [2];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5];  [6];  [7];  [1];  [2];  [8]
  1. City University of New York
  2. Arizona State University
  3. Arizona State University; Universitat Trier Betriebswirtschaftslehre
  4. Durham University
  5. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  6. Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas
  7. New York University
  8. National Institute for Scientific Research, Montreal, Canada
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1566049
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5400-74945
DOE Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
WIREs Climate Change
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: WIREs Climate Change
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; adaptation-mitigation synergy; extreme events; low carbon transitions

Citation Formats

Solecki, William, Grimm, Nancy, Marcotullio, Peter, Boone, Christopher, Lobo, Jose, Luque, Andres, Romero Lankao, Patricia, Young, Andrea, Zimmerman, Rae, Breitzer, Rebekah, Griffith, Corrie, and Aylett, Alexander. Extreme Events and Climate Adaptation-Mitigation Linkages: Understanding Low-Carbon Transitions in the Era of Global Urbanization. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1002/wcc.616.
Solecki, William, Grimm, Nancy, Marcotullio, Peter, Boone, Christopher, Lobo, Jose, Luque, Andres, Romero Lankao, Patricia, Young, Andrea, Zimmerman, Rae, Breitzer, Rebekah, Griffith, Corrie, & Aylett, Alexander. Extreme Events and Climate Adaptation-Mitigation Linkages: Understanding Low-Carbon Transitions in the Era of Global Urbanization. United States. doi:10.1002/wcc.616.
Solecki, William, Grimm, Nancy, Marcotullio, Peter, Boone, Christopher, Lobo, Jose, Luque, Andres, Romero Lankao, Patricia, Young, Andrea, Zimmerman, Rae, Breitzer, Rebekah, Griffith, Corrie, and Aylett, Alexander. Thu . "Extreme Events and Climate Adaptation-Mitigation Linkages: Understanding Low-Carbon Transitions in the Era of Global Urbanization". United States. doi:10.1002/wcc.616.
@article{osti_1566049,
title = {Extreme Events and Climate Adaptation-Mitigation Linkages: Understanding Low-Carbon Transitions in the Era of Global Urbanization},
author = {Solecki, William and Grimm, Nancy and Marcotullio, Peter and Boone, Christopher and Lobo, Jose and Luque, Andres and Romero Lankao, Patricia and Young, Andrea and Zimmerman, Rae and Breitzer, Rebekah and Griffith, Corrie and Aylett, Alexander},
abstractNote = {It has become increasingly clear that cities will have to simultaneously undertake both adaptation and mitigation in response to accelerating climate change and the growing demands for meaningful climate action. Here we examine the connections between climate mitigation and climate adaptation, specifically, between low-carbon energy systems and extreme events. The article specifically addresses the question, how do responses to extreme climate risks enhance or limit capacity to promote city-level greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation? As a step toward answering this question, we present a framework for considering windows of opportunity that may arise as a result of extreme events and how these windows can be exploited to foster development and implementation of low-carbon energy strategies. Four brief case studies are used to provide empirical background and determine the impact of potential windows of opportunity. Some general conclusions are defined. In particular, the existing energy system structure is an important determinant of impact and potential for energy transitions. Well-developed and articulated governance strategies and ready access of effective and economically efficient alternative energy technology were key to transitions. However, prospects for inequity in development and implementation of low-carbon solutions need to be considered. Finally, exploiting windows of opportunity afforded by extreme events for developing low-carbon economy and infrastructure also can provide resilience against those very events. These types of responses will be needed as extreme events increase in frequency and magnitude in the future, with cities as primary sites of impact and action.},
doi = {10.1002/wcc.616},
journal = {WIREs Climate Change},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {8}
}