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Title: Embedment of sensors in ceramic structures

Abstract

Ceramic materials such as silicon carbide (SiC) are attractive for many nuclear applications due to their ability to withstand high temperatures, which inherently improve the thermal efficiency of the power conversion cycle and can in some cases provide high-temperature process heat. SiC is particularly attractive because of its high-temperature strength retention, stability under neutron irradiation, and low neutron absorption. The TCR program has recently demonstrated the ability to fabricate monolithic SiC components with complex geometries using a binder jet additive manufacturing technique followed by densification using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). This technology presents an opportunity to embed sensors within ceramic components at critical locations that allow for enhanced process monitoring and control of advanced nuclear energy systems. The challenges with embedding sensors in ceramic components are to identify appropriate materials that can survive the CVI process, remain embedded after cooling to room temperature, and be suitable for operation in a high-temperature nuclear environment. This report summarizes the sensors that are being considered for embedding within ceramics, the sensor embedding process, material compatibility studies, and characterization of the embedded components. Material selection is first guided by computational thermodynamics and is confirmed by embedding coupons and examining material interactions using electron microscopy.more » This work shows that a wide range of refractory metals, as well as certain fiber optic sensors, can be successfully embedded in 3D-printed SiC. Future work will involve testing of functional sensors including thermocouples and optical fiber-based, spatially distributed temperature/strain sensors.« less


Citation Formats

Petrie, Christian M., Leonard, Donovan N., Yang, Ying, Trammell, Michael P., Jolly, Brian C., and Terrani, Kurt. Embedment of sensors in ceramic structures. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1564172.
Petrie, Christian M., Leonard, Donovan N., Yang, Ying, Trammell, Michael P., Jolly, Brian C., & Terrani, Kurt. Embedment of sensors in ceramic structures. United States. doi:10.2172/1564172.
Petrie, Christian M., Leonard, Donovan N., Yang, Ying, Trammell, Michael P., Jolly, Brian C., and Terrani, Kurt. Sun . "Embedment of sensors in ceramic structures". United States. doi:10.2172/1564172. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1564172.
@article{osti_1564172,
title = {Embedment of sensors in ceramic structures},
author = {Petrie, Christian M. and Leonard, Donovan N. and Yang, Ying and Trammell, Michael P. and Jolly, Brian C. and Terrani, Kurt},
abstractNote = {Ceramic materials such as silicon carbide (SiC) are attractive for many nuclear applications due to their ability to withstand high temperatures, which inherently improve the thermal efficiency of the power conversion cycle and can in some cases provide high-temperature process heat. SiC is particularly attractive because of its high-temperature strength retention, stability under neutron irradiation, and low neutron absorption. The TCR program has recently demonstrated the ability to fabricate monolithic SiC components with complex geometries using a binder jet additive manufacturing technique followed by densification using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). This technology presents an opportunity to embed sensors within ceramic components at critical locations that allow for enhanced process monitoring and control of advanced nuclear energy systems. The challenges with embedding sensors in ceramic components are to identify appropriate materials that can survive the CVI process, remain embedded after cooling to room temperature, and be suitable for operation in a high-temperature nuclear environment. This report summarizes the sensors that are being considered for embedding within ceramics, the sensor embedding process, material compatibility studies, and characterization of the embedded components. Material selection is first guided by computational thermodynamics and is confirmed by embedding coupons and examining material interactions using electron microscopy. This work shows that a wide range of refractory metals, as well as certain fiber optic sensors, can be successfully embedded in 3D-printed SiC. Future work will involve testing of functional sensors including thermocouples and optical fiber-based, spatially distributed temperature/strain sensors.},
doi = {10.2172/1564172},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {9}
}

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