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Title: Structure and Electronic Properties of InSb Nanowires Grown in Flexible Polycarbonate Membranes

Abstract

A dense array of vertically aligned indium antimonide (InSb) nanowires with high aspect ratio (diameter 150 nm, length 20 μm) were grown in the pores of a track-etched polycarbonate membrane via a one-step electrochemical method. There are several reports on InSb nanowire growth in the pores of a mechanically rigid, nano-channel alumina template (NCA), where nanowire growth occurs in the pores of the NCA. This work on InSb nanowire growth in pores of track-etched polycarbonate (PC) membrane sheds light on the various factors that affect nucleation and nanowire growth. The average length and diameter of the as-grown nanowires was about 10 μm and 150 nm, respectively. Two possible mechanisms accounting for two different morphologies of the as-grown nanowires are proposed. The polycrystallinity observed in some of the nanowires is explained using the 3D ‘nucleation-coalescence’ mechanism. On the other hand, single crystal nanowires with a high density of twin defects and stacking faults grow epitaxially by a two-dimensional (2D) nucleation/growth mechanism. To assess the electrical quality of the nanowires, two- and four-terminal devices were fabricated using a single InSb nanowire contacted by two Ni electrodes. It was found that, at low bias, the ohmic current is controlled by charge diffusion frommore » the bulk contacts. On the other hand, at high bias, the effects of space charge limited current (SCLC) are evident in the current–voltage behavior, characteristic of transport through structures with reduced electrostatic screening. A cross-over from ohmic to SCLC occurs at about 0.14 V, yielding a free carrier concentration of the order of 10 14 cm -3.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [1];  [3];  [1];  [1]
  1. Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States)
  2. Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22). Materials Sciences & Engineering Division
OSTI Identifier:
1561613
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nanomaterials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 2079-4991
Publisher:
MDPI
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; polycrytaline InSb nanowire; electrochemical deposition; space charge limited current (SCLC); polycorbonate template

Citation Formats

Singh, Abhay Pratap, Roccapriore, Kevin, Salloom, Riyadh, Golden, Teresa, Philipose, Usha, and Algarni, Zaina. Structure and Electronic Properties of InSb Nanowires Grown in Flexible Polycarbonate Membranes. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.3390/nano9091260.
Singh, Abhay Pratap, Roccapriore, Kevin, Salloom, Riyadh, Golden, Teresa, Philipose, Usha, & Algarni, Zaina. Structure and Electronic Properties of InSb Nanowires Grown in Flexible Polycarbonate Membranes. United States. doi:10.3390/nano9091260.
Singh, Abhay Pratap, Roccapriore, Kevin, Salloom, Riyadh, Golden, Teresa, Philipose, Usha, and Algarni, Zaina. Thu . "Structure and Electronic Properties of InSb Nanowires Grown in Flexible Polycarbonate Membranes". United States. doi:10.3390/nano9091260. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1561613.
@article{osti_1561613,
title = {Structure and Electronic Properties of InSb Nanowires Grown in Flexible Polycarbonate Membranes},
author = {Singh, Abhay Pratap and Roccapriore, Kevin and Salloom, Riyadh and Golden, Teresa and Philipose, Usha and Algarni, Zaina},
abstractNote = {A dense array of vertically aligned indium antimonide (InSb) nanowires with high aspect ratio (diameter 150 nm, length 20μm) were grown in the pores of a track-etched polycarbonate membrane via a one-step electrochemical method. There are several reports on InSb nanowire growth in the pores of a mechanically rigid, nano-channel alumina template (NCA), where nanowire growth occurs in the pores of the NCA. This work on InSb nanowire growth in pores of track-etched polycarbonate (PC) membrane sheds light on the various factors that affect nucleation and nanowire growth. The average length and diameter of the as-grown nanowires was about 10μm and 150 nm, respectively. Two possible mechanisms accounting for two different morphologies of the as-grown nanowires are proposed. The polycrystallinity observed in some of the nanowires is explained using the 3D ‘nucleation-coalescence’ mechanism. On the other hand, single crystal nanowires with a high density of twin defects and stacking faults grow epitaxially by a two-dimensional (2D) nucleation/growth mechanism. To assess the electrical quality of the nanowires, two- and four-terminal devices were fabricated using a single InSb nanowire contacted by two Ni electrodes. It was found that, at low bias, the ohmic current is controlled by charge diffusion from the bulk contacts. On the other hand, at high bias, the effects of space charge limited current (SCLC) are evident in the current–voltage behavior, characteristic of transport through structures with reduced electrostatic screening. A cross-over from ohmic to SCLC occurs at about 0.14 V, yielding a free carrier concentration of the order of 1014 cm-3.},
doi = {10.3390/nano9091260},
journal = {Nanomaterials},
issn = {2079-4991},
number = 9,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {9}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Figures / Tables:

Figure 1 Figure 1: Results from cyclic voltammogram showing variation of current with positive (oxidizing) potentials and negative (reducing) potentials. Increasing the negative potential beyond −1.5 V leads to hydrogen evolution.

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