skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Demonstration of Fully Coupled Calculations in Helical Steam Generator: Toward Predictions of Fluid Elastic Instability

Abstract

The NEAMS program aims to develop an integrated multi-physics simulation capability “pellet-to-plant” for the design and analysis of future generations of nuclear power plants. In particular, the Reactor Product Line code suite's multi-resolution hierarchy is being designed to ultimately span the full range of length and time scales present in relevant reactor design and safety analyses, as well as scale from desktop to petaflop computing platforms. Flow-induced vibration (FIV) is widespread problem in energy systems because they rely on fluid movement for energy conversion. Vibrating structures may be damaged as fatigue or wear occurs. Given the importance of reliable components in the nuclear industry, flow-induced vibration has long been a major concern in safety and operation of nuclear reactors. In particular, nuclear fuel rods and steam generators have been known to suffer from flow-induced vibration and related failures. Advanced reactors, such as integral Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) considered for Small Modular Reactors (SMR), often rely on innovative component designs to meet cost and safety targets. One component that is the subject of advanced designs is the steam generator, some designs of which forego the usual shell-and-tube architecture in order to fit within the primary vessel. In addition to being moremore » cost- and space-efficient, such steam generators need to be more reliable, since failure of the primary vessel represents a potential loss of coolant and a safety concern. A significant amount of data exists on flow-induced vibration in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, and heuristic methods are available to predict their occurrence based on a set of given assumptions. In contrast, advanced designs have far less data available. Advanced modeling and simulation based on coupled structural and fluid simulations have the potential to predict flow-induced vibration in a variety of designs, reducing the need for expensive experimental programs, especially at the design stage. Over the past seven years, the Reactor Product Line has developed the integrated multi-physics code suite SHARP. The goal of developing such a tool is to perform multi-physics neutronics, thermal/fluid, and structural mechanics modeling of the components inside the full reactor core or portions of it with a user-specified fidelity. In particular SHARP contains high-fidelity single-physics codes Diablo for structural mechanics and Nek5000 for fluid mechanics calculations. Both codes are state-of-the-art, highly scalable tools that have been extensively validated. These tools form a strong basis on which to build a flow-induced vibration modeling capability. In the last two years a significant effort was devoted to 1) develop and validate a fully coupled capability in SHARP for Fluid-Structure calculations (FSI) and 2) validate the use of SHARP for one-way coupled calculations in helical steam generators on legacy data available as well as novel experiments. In this report we discuss an extension of previous one-way coupled calculations performed with Nek5000 and Diablo aimed at simulating available FIV experiments in helical steam generators in the turbulent buffeting regime. It was demonstrated that in the buffeting regime one-way coupling was judged sufficient because the pressure loads do not cause substantial displacements. However, higher speeds led to a reduction in accuracy and the need for a fully coupled capability for velocity or approaching the critical velocity and fluid elastic instability. In this report we demonstrate such fully coupled capability on the Argonne test case discussed in previous reports.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1561527
Report Number(s):
ANL/NSE-19/20
154499
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Merzari, E., Yuan, H., Rahaman, R., and Solberg, J. Demonstration of Fully Coupled Calculations in Helical Steam Generator: Toward Predictions of Fluid Elastic Instability. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1561527.
Merzari, E., Yuan, H., Rahaman, R., & Solberg, J. Demonstration of Fully Coupled Calculations in Helical Steam Generator: Toward Predictions of Fluid Elastic Instability. United States. doi:10.2172/1561527.
Merzari, E., Yuan, H., Rahaman, R., and Solberg, J. Mon . "Demonstration of Fully Coupled Calculations in Helical Steam Generator: Toward Predictions of Fluid Elastic Instability". United States. doi:10.2172/1561527. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1561527.
@article{osti_1561527,
title = {Demonstration of Fully Coupled Calculations in Helical Steam Generator: Toward Predictions of Fluid Elastic Instability},
author = {Merzari, E. and Yuan, H. and Rahaman, R. and Solberg, J.},
abstractNote = {The NEAMS program aims to develop an integrated multi-physics simulation capability “pellet-to-plant” for the design and analysis of future generations of nuclear power plants. In particular, the Reactor Product Line code suite's multi-resolution hierarchy is being designed to ultimately span the full range of length and time scales present in relevant reactor design and safety analyses, as well as scale from desktop to petaflop computing platforms. Flow-induced vibration (FIV) is widespread problem in energy systems because they rely on fluid movement for energy conversion. Vibrating structures may be damaged as fatigue or wear occurs. Given the importance of reliable components in the nuclear industry, flow-induced vibration has long been a major concern in safety and operation of nuclear reactors. In particular, nuclear fuel rods and steam generators have been known to suffer from flow-induced vibration and related failures. Advanced reactors, such as integral Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) considered for Small Modular Reactors (SMR), often rely on innovative component designs to meet cost and safety targets. One component that is the subject of advanced designs is the steam generator, some designs of which forego the usual shell-and-tube architecture in order to fit within the primary vessel. In addition to being more cost- and space-efficient, such steam generators need to be more reliable, since failure of the primary vessel represents a potential loss of coolant and a safety concern. A significant amount of data exists on flow-induced vibration in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, and heuristic methods are available to predict their occurrence based on a set of given assumptions. In contrast, advanced designs have far less data available. Advanced modeling and simulation based on coupled structural and fluid simulations have the potential to predict flow-induced vibration in a variety of designs, reducing the need for expensive experimental programs, especially at the design stage. Over the past seven years, the Reactor Product Line has developed the integrated multi-physics code suite SHARP. The goal of developing such a tool is to perform multi-physics neutronics, thermal/fluid, and structural mechanics modeling of the components inside the full reactor core or portions of it with a user-specified fidelity. In particular SHARP contains high-fidelity single-physics codes Diablo for structural mechanics and Nek5000 for fluid mechanics calculations. Both codes are state-of-the-art, highly scalable tools that have been extensively validated. These tools form a strong basis on which to build a flow-induced vibration modeling capability. In the last two years a significant effort was devoted to 1) develop and validate a fully coupled capability in SHARP for Fluid-Structure calculations (FSI) and 2) validate the use of SHARP for one-way coupled calculations in helical steam generators on legacy data available as well as novel experiments. In this report we discuss an extension of previous one-way coupled calculations performed with Nek5000 and Diablo aimed at simulating available FIV experiments in helical steam generators in the turbulent buffeting regime. It was demonstrated that in the buffeting regime one-way coupling was judged sufficient because the pressure loads do not cause substantial displacements. However, higher speeds led to a reduction in accuracy and the need for a fully coupled capability for velocity or approaching the critical velocity and fluid elastic instability. In this report we demonstrate such fully coupled capability on the Argonne test case discussed in previous reports.},
doi = {10.2172/1561527},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {9}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: