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Title: Continuation Report: Creep-fatigue Behavior and Damage Accumulation of a Candidate Structural Material for Concentrating Solar Thermal Receiver

Abstract

At the start of this phase, six alloys were determined to be candidate materials for the concentrating solar power (CSP) thermal receiver: Alloys 617, 625, 740H, 230, 282 and Alloy X. From these, Alloys 740H and 282 were determined to be the most suitable, with both alloys exhibiting similar high temperature strength properties. Alloy 740H was selected due to its ease to work with (simpler heat treatments and welding procedures) and a larger database of existing data. Fatigue testing was started in this phase, with four fatigue tests having been completed, with additional fatigue testing planned, as well as tensile, creep and creep-fatigue tests starting in the next phase. Two fatigue tests performed at 850 °C and were completed in significantly fewer cycles than the two tests performed at 750 °C. Metallography was performed on the fatigued specimens to examine crack path and surrounding microstructure. These preliminary results suggest a significant drop in strength at elevated temperatures above 750 °C, however, more test results will be needed prior to setting design limits. Several potential model high temperature design methods were evaluated that could form the basis of our final recommended creep-fatigue design method for Alloy 740H. To do this wemore » expanded on the receiver finite element model to develop a model representative of a potential Gen 3 design using KCl-MgCl2 salt coolant and operating with a salt inlet temperature of 550°C and salt outlet temperature of 720°C. Using the temperature fields from the model thermohydraulic analysis we determined the design life of the reference receiver assuming it was constructed from 740H seamless tubing and assuming high temperature design properties for 740H from literature data and, where required, naïve extrapolation. As experimental data is generated, these tentative design parameters will be updated to match the actual performance of 740H in elevated temperature service. The results of this design study are a rank ordering of potential design methods for two criteria: ease of use and design margin. The end goal of this project is to develop a creep-fatigue design method with adequate, but not over conservative, design margin that is straightforward to execute. Our receiver model is based on the preliminary design provided to DOE by Solar Reserve. Our analysis indicates a peak metal temperature of around 840° C for this design (comparable to Solar Reserve’s analysis, which shows a peak metal temperature of around 830° C). The Solar Reserve tube thickness is too thin to sustain creep-fatigue loading at this temperature. This means that the current trial design is not well-suited for evaluating different design methodologies, as we predict it will have a very short design life. We suggest that we modify our reference design with input from DOE in order to lower the maximum metal temperature to less than 800° C. We can then repeat these analyses and give a more meaningful comparison of different design methods before making a final selection.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Idaho National Laboratory
  2. Argonne National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1561231
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-18-52306-Rev000
DOE Contract Number:  
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
S&T Accomplishment Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 - SOLAR ENERGY; 36 - MATERIALS SCIENCE; Gen3 CSP; High temperature materials; Design models

Citation Formats

McMurtrey, Michael D, Messner, Mark, and Barua, Bipul. Continuation Report: Creep-fatigue Behavior and Damage Accumulation of a Candidate Structural Material for Concentrating Solar Thermal Receiver. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1561231.
McMurtrey, Michael D, Messner, Mark, & Barua, Bipul. Continuation Report: Creep-fatigue Behavior and Damage Accumulation of a Candidate Structural Material for Concentrating Solar Thermal Receiver. United States. doi:10.2172/1561231.
McMurtrey, Michael D, Messner, Mark, and Barua, Bipul. Tue . "Continuation Report: Creep-fatigue Behavior and Damage Accumulation of a Candidate Structural Material for Concentrating Solar Thermal Receiver". United States. doi:10.2172/1561231. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1561231.
@article{osti_1561231,
title = {Continuation Report: Creep-fatigue Behavior and Damage Accumulation of a Candidate Structural Material for Concentrating Solar Thermal Receiver},
author = {McMurtrey, Michael D and Messner, Mark and Barua, Bipul},
abstractNote = {At the start of this phase, six alloys were determined to be candidate materials for the concentrating solar power (CSP) thermal receiver: Alloys 617, 625, 740H, 230, 282 and Alloy X. From these, Alloys 740H and 282 were determined to be the most suitable, with both alloys exhibiting similar high temperature strength properties. Alloy 740H was selected due to its ease to work with (simpler heat treatments and welding procedures) and a larger database of existing data. Fatigue testing was started in this phase, with four fatigue tests having been completed, with additional fatigue testing planned, as well as tensile, creep and creep-fatigue tests starting in the next phase. Two fatigue tests performed at 850 °C and were completed in significantly fewer cycles than the two tests performed at 750 °C. Metallography was performed on the fatigued specimens to examine crack path and surrounding microstructure. These preliminary results suggest a significant drop in strength at elevated temperatures above 750 °C, however, more test results will be needed prior to setting design limits. Several potential model high temperature design methods were evaluated that could form the basis of our final recommended creep-fatigue design method for Alloy 740H. To do this we expanded on the receiver finite element model to develop a model representative of a potential Gen 3 design using KCl-MgCl2 salt coolant and operating with a salt inlet temperature of 550°C and salt outlet temperature of 720°C. Using the temperature fields from the model thermohydraulic analysis we determined the design life of the reference receiver assuming it was constructed from 740H seamless tubing and assuming high temperature design properties for 740H from literature data and, where required, naïve extrapolation. As experimental data is generated, these tentative design parameters will be updated to match the actual performance of 740H in elevated temperature service. The results of this design study are a rank ordering of potential design methods for two criteria: ease of use and design margin. The end goal of this project is to develop a creep-fatigue design method with adequate, but not over conservative, design margin that is straightforward to execute. Our receiver model is based on the preliminary design provided to DOE by Solar Reserve. Our analysis indicates a peak metal temperature of around 840° C for this design (comparable to Solar Reserve’s analysis, which shows a peak metal temperature of around 830° C). The Solar Reserve tube thickness is too thin to sustain creep-fatigue loading at this temperature. This means that the current trial design is not well-suited for evaluating different design methodologies, as we predict it will have a very short design life. We suggest that we modify our reference design with input from DOE in order to lower the maximum metal temperature to less than 800° C. We can then repeat these analyses and give a more meaningful comparison of different design methods before making a final selection.},
doi = {10.2172/1561231},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {12}
}