skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: UAS Radiological Sensing – Nevada National Security Site

Abstract

In the aftermath of a hazardous incident, there is limited information and almost no means to access the area safely. There is a need to quickly obtain accurate information regarding the extent and severity of the incident. One way to quickly assess the environment is by flying over the dangerous area with unmanned aerial systems followed by remotely operated ground vehicles. The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) provides a repeatable environment to simulate operations for dangerous and dirty situations. An unmanned aircraft system (UAS) has the advantages of fast deployment and low-altitude flying, which enhances sensitivity and wide-area coverage, eliminates radiation exposure health safety restrictions, and gives the ability to access highly hazardous or radioactive areas, etc. A UAS can be configured with the nuclear detecting sensor optimized to measure the radiation associated with the event. A multi-UAS has advantages over a single UAS, especially in time-critical tasks such as detecting nuclear radiation. UAS may be helpful in plume definition, ground deposition, moving source, and static or moving spills. Assessing any situation that is dangerous, in hazardous areas (dirty), needs to be repeated (dull), or unreachable (deep), is a candidate for an unmanned system. In addition, the NNSS is inmore » a unique location to conduct isolated, secured, and controlled high-risk experiments. We attract international customers along with domestic agencies due to the unique environmental conditions that have evolved over the past 65 years. The NNSS employs a talented group of operational scientists and engineers with a long history of applied research in radiation/nuclear science. We often collaborate with other national laboratories and universities in addressing unique problems. The NNSS has conducted UAS missions for over 25 years and has established a UAS program to address the difficult challenges in using unmanned systems for national security missions.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];
  1. Nevada National Security Site, Mission Support and Test Services LLC
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Nevada National Security Site/Mission Support and Test Services LLC; Las Vegas, NV (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of Emergency Operations (NA-40)
OSTI Identifier:
1559985
Report Number(s):
DOE/NV/03624-0581
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-NA0003624
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2019 EMI SIG [Emergency Management Issues Special Interest Group] Annual Meeting, Knoxville Convention Center, September 16-20, 2019, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; 42 ENGINEERING; Nevada National Security Site, NNSS, unmanned aircraft system, UAS, radiological sensing, plume definition, ground deposition, moving source,

Citation Formats

Guss, Paul, Trainham, Rusty, McCall, Karen, and al., et. UAS Radiological Sensing – Nevada National Security Site. United States: N. p., 2019. Web.
Guss, Paul, Trainham, Rusty, McCall, Karen, & al., et. UAS Radiological Sensing – Nevada National Security Site. United States.
Guss, Paul, Trainham, Rusty, McCall, Karen, and al., et. Thu . "UAS Radiological Sensing – Nevada National Security Site". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1559985.
@article{osti_1559985,
title = {UAS Radiological Sensing – Nevada National Security Site},
author = {Guss, Paul and Trainham, Rusty and McCall, Karen and al., et},
abstractNote = {In the aftermath of a hazardous incident, there is limited information and almost no means to access the area safely. There is a need to quickly obtain accurate information regarding the extent and severity of the incident. One way to quickly assess the environment is by flying over the dangerous area with unmanned aerial systems followed by remotely operated ground vehicles. The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) provides a repeatable environment to simulate operations for dangerous and dirty situations. An unmanned aircraft system (UAS) has the advantages of fast deployment and low-altitude flying, which enhances sensitivity and wide-area coverage, eliminates radiation exposure health safety restrictions, and gives the ability to access highly hazardous or radioactive areas, etc. A UAS can be configured with the nuclear detecting sensor optimized to measure the radiation associated with the event. A multi-UAS has advantages over a single UAS, especially in time-critical tasks such as detecting nuclear radiation. UAS may be helpful in plume definition, ground deposition, moving source, and static or moving spills. Assessing any situation that is dangerous, in hazardous areas (dirty), needs to be repeated (dull), or unreachable (deep), is a candidate for an unmanned system. In addition, the NNSS is in a unique location to conduct isolated, secured, and controlled high-risk experiments. We attract international customers along with domestic agencies due to the unique environmental conditions that have evolved over the past 65 years. The NNSS employs a talented group of operational scientists and engineers with a long history of applied research in radiation/nuclear science. We often collaborate with other national laboratories and universities in addressing unique problems. The NNSS has conducted UAS missions for over 25 years and has established a UAS program to address the difficult challenges in using unmanned systems for national security missions.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {9}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: