skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Impacts of coastal reclamation on wetlands: Loss, resilience, and sustainable management

Abstract

Coastal wetlands are some of the most valuable ecosystems on Earth because they provide many ecological services for coastal security. However, these wetlands are seriously threatened by accelerated climate change and intensive anthropogenic activities. To understand the impacts of land reclamation on landscape change of coastal wetlands and the long-term effects of disturbances of coastal wetlands on their sustainable management, we used time-series Landsat imagery with an object-oriented classification and Digital Shoreline Analysis System to map wetland changes within a reclaimed area in the Pudong District (PD), in Shanghai, China. Our analysis indicated that from 1989 to 2013, 19,793.4 ha of coastal wetlands have been changed to inland wetlands enclosed by a seawall and dike since 1989, thereby cutting off the exchange of sediment and water flux between the wetlands and the coastal ocean. Subsequently, under the increasing threats of anthropogenic activities, the wetland ecosystem collapsed sharply, in a transformation chain of inland wetland (fresh swamp), artificial wetland (agriculture and aquaculture wetland), and non-wetland (urban land). Under this explosive utilization following coastal reclamation, only 8.9% of natural wetlands remain in the reclaimed area, which has experienced an average annual wetland loss rate of 3.8% over the past 24 years. Moremore » than 80% of the wetlands have been developed for agricultural, industrial, and urban land uses, leading to an enormous loss of associated ecological services—benefits arising from the ecological functions provided by wetland ecosystems, thereby undermining the coastal protection these wetlands provided. Nevertheless, considerable regeneration of wetlands occurred because of their inherent resilience. This paper addresses the importance of maintaining a balance between economic growth and coastal ecological protection for sustainable management. It proposes a strategy for how ecosystem-based land planning and ecological engineering should be applied to ensure the effective and sustainable management of living shorelines so that the benefits of healthy ecological functions accrue to coastal ecosystems.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. East China Normal University
  2. BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1558385
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-135890
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 210
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Reclamation, Remote sensing, landscape change, coastal management

Citation Formats

Wu, Wenting, Yang, Zhaoqing, Tian, Bo, Huang, Ying, Zhou, Yun-xuan, and Zhang, Ting. Impacts of coastal reclamation on wetlands: Loss, resilience, and sustainable management. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ecss.2018.06.013.
Wu, Wenting, Yang, Zhaoqing, Tian, Bo, Huang, Ying, Zhou, Yun-xuan, & Zhang, Ting. Impacts of coastal reclamation on wetlands: Loss, resilience, and sustainable management. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ecss.2018.06.013.
Wu, Wenting, Yang, Zhaoqing, Tian, Bo, Huang, Ying, Zhou, Yun-xuan, and Zhang, Ting. Mon . "Impacts of coastal reclamation on wetlands: Loss, resilience, and sustainable management". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ecss.2018.06.013.
@article{osti_1558385,
title = {Impacts of coastal reclamation on wetlands: Loss, resilience, and sustainable management},
author = {Wu, Wenting and Yang, Zhaoqing and Tian, Bo and Huang, Ying and Zhou, Yun-xuan and Zhang, Ting},
abstractNote = {Coastal wetlands are some of the most valuable ecosystems on Earth because they provide many ecological services for coastal security. However, these wetlands are seriously threatened by accelerated climate change and intensive anthropogenic activities. To understand the impacts of land reclamation on landscape change of coastal wetlands and the long-term effects of disturbances of coastal wetlands on their sustainable management, we used time-series Landsat imagery with an object-oriented classification and Digital Shoreline Analysis System to map wetland changes within a reclaimed area in the Pudong District (PD), in Shanghai, China. Our analysis indicated that from 1989 to 2013, 19,793.4 ha of coastal wetlands have been changed to inland wetlands enclosed by a seawall and dike since 1989, thereby cutting off the exchange of sediment and water flux between the wetlands and the coastal ocean. Subsequently, under the increasing threats of anthropogenic activities, the wetland ecosystem collapsed sharply, in a transformation chain of inland wetland (fresh swamp), artificial wetland (agriculture and aquaculture wetland), and non-wetland (urban land). Under this explosive utilization following coastal reclamation, only 8.9% of natural wetlands remain in the reclaimed area, which has experienced an average annual wetland loss rate of 3.8% over the past 24 years. More than 80% of the wetlands have been developed for agricultural, industrial, and urban land uses, leading to an enormous loss of associated ecological services—benefits arising from the ecological functions provided by wetland ecosystems, thereby undermining the coastal protection these wetlands provided. Nevertheless, considerable regeneration of wetlands occurred because of their inherent resilience. This paper addresses the importance of maintaining a balance between economic growth and coastal ecological protection for sustainable management. It proposes a strategy for how ecosystem-based land planning and ecological engineering should be applied to ensure the effective and sustainable management of living shorelines so that the benefits of healthy ecological functions accrue to coastal ecosystems.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ecss.2018.06.013},
journal = {Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science},
number = ,
volume = 210,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {10}
}