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Title: Monitoring annoyance and stress effects of wind turbines on nearby residents: A comparison of U.S. and European samples

Abstract

As wind turbines and the number of wind projects scale throughout the world, a growing number of individuals might be affected by these structures. For some people, wind turbine sounds and their effects on the landscape can be annoying and could even prompt stress reactions. This comparative study analyzed a combined sample of survey respondents from the U.S., Germany and Switzerland. It utilized a newly developed assessment scale (AS-Scale) to reliably characterize these stress-impacted individuals living within populations near turbines. Findings indicate low prevalence of annoyance, stress symptoms and coping strategies. Noise annoyance stress (NAS-Scale) was negatively correlated with the perceptions of a lack of fairness of the wind project's planning and development process, among other subjective variables. Objective indicators, such as the distance from the nearest turbine and sound pressure level modeled for each respondent, were not found to be correlated to noise annoyance. Similar result patterns were found across the European and U.S. samples.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4]; ORCiD logo [3];  [5]; ORCiD logo [6]
  1. Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale)(Germany); Univ. of Applied Science and Medical Univ., Hamburg (Germany)
  2. Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale)(Germany); Univ. of Applied Science and Medical Univ., Hamburg (Germany)
  3. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  4. Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)
  5. Portland State Univ., Portland, OR (United States)
  6. Resource Systems Group Inc., White River Junction, VT (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind Energy Technologies Office (EE-4WE)
OSTI Identifier:
1557891
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1560615
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Environment International
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 132; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0160-4120
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; Wind turbine annoyance assessment; Stress effects; Annoyance monitoring; International comparison

Citation Formats

Hübner, Gundula, Pohl, Johannes, Hoen, Ben, Firestone, Jeremy, Rand, Joseph, Elliott, Debi, and Haac, Ryan. Monitoring annoyance and stress effects of wind turbines on nearby residents: A comparison of U.S. and European samples. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1016/j.envint.2019.105090.
Hübner, Gundula, Pohl, Johannes, Hoen, Ben, Firestone, Jeremy, Rand, Joseph, Elliott, Debi, & Haac, Ryan. Monitoring annoyance and stress effects of wind turbines on nearby residents: A comparison of U.S. and European samples. United States. doi:10.1016/j.envint.2019.105090.
Hübner, Gundula, Pohl, Johannes, Hoen, Ben, Firestone, Jeremy, Rand, Joseph, Elliott, Debi, and Haac, Ryan. Mon . "Monitoring annoyance and stress effects of wind turbines on nearby residents: A comparison of U.S. and European samples". United States. doi:10.1016/j.envint.2019.105090.
@article{osti_1557891,
title = {Monitoring annoyance and stress effects of wind turbines on nearby residents: A comparison of U.S. and European samples},
author = {Hübner, Gundula and Pohl, Johannes and Hoen, Ben and Firestone, Jeremy and Rand, Joseph and Elliott, Debi and Haac, Ryan},
abstractNote = {As wind turbines and the number of wind projects scale throughout the world, a growing number of individuals might be affected by these structures. For some people, wind turbine sounds and their effects on the landscape can be annoying and could even prompt stress reactions. This comparative study analyzed a combined sample of survey respondents from the U.S., Germany and Switzerland. It utilized a newly developed assessment scale (AS-Scale) to reliably characterize these stress-impacted individuals living within populations near turbines. Findings indicate low prevalence of annoyance, stress symptoms and coping strategies. Noise annoyance stress (NAS-Scale) was negatively correlated with the perceptions of a lack of fairness of the wind project's planning and development process, among other subjective variables. Objective indicators, such as the distance from the nearest turbine and sound pressure level modeled for each respondent, were not found to be correlated to noise annoyance. Similar result patterns were found across the European and U.S. samples.},
doi = {10.1016/j.envint.2019.105090},
journal = {Environment International},
issn = {0160-4120},
number = C,
volume = 132,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {8}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.envint.2019.105090

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1 work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Figures / Tables:

Table 1 Table 1: Summary of studies, samples and wind farms for residents within 4.8 km of the nearest WT.

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