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Title: Forfeiting the priority effect: turnover defines biofilm community succession

Abstract

Microbial community succession is a fundamental process that affects underlying functions of almost all ecosystems; yet the roles and fates of the most abundant colonizers are often poorly understood. Does early abundance spur long term persistence? How do deterministic and stochastic processes influence the ecological contribution of colonizers? We performed a succession experiment within a hypersaline ecosystem to investigate how different processes contributed to the turnover of founder species. Bacterial and eukaryotic colonizers were identified during primary succession and tracked through a defined, 79-day biofilm maturation period using 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequencing in combination with high resolution imaging that utilized stable isotope tracers to evaluate successional patterns of primary producers and nitrogen fixers. The majority of the founder species did not maintain high abundance throughout succession. Species replacement (versus loss) was the dominant process shaping community succession. We also asked if different ecological processes acted on bacteria versus Eukaryotes during succession and found deterministic and stochastic forces corresponded more with microeukaryote and bacterial colonization, respectively. Our results show that taxa and functions belonging to different kingdoms, which share habitat in the tight spatial confines of a biofilm, were influenced by different ecological processes and time scales of succession.


Citation Formats

Brislawn, Colin J., Graham, Emily B., Dana, Karl L., Ilhardt, Peter D., Fansler, Sarah J., Chrisler, William B., Cliff, John B., Stegen, James C., Moran, James J., and Bernstein, Hans C. Forfeiting the priority effect: turnover defines biofilm community succession. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1038/s41396-019-0396-x.
Brislawn, Colin J., Graham, Emily B., Dana, Karl L., Ilhardt, Peter D., Fansler, Sarah J., Chrisler, William B., Cliff, John B., Stegen, James C., Moran, James J., & Bernstein, Hans C. Forfeiting the priority effect: turnover defines biofilm community succession. United States. doi:10.1038/s41396-019-0396-x.
Brislawn, Colin J., Graham, Emily B., Dana, Karl L., Ilhardt, Peter D., Fansler, Sarah J., Chrisler, William B., Cliff, John B., Stegen, James C., Moran, James J., and Bernstein, Hans C. Mon . "Forfeiting the priority effect: turnover defines biofilm community succession". United States. doi:10.1038/s41396-019-0396-x.
@article{osti_1557181,
title = {Forfeiting the priority effect: turnover defines biofilm community succession},
author = {Brislawn, Colin J. and Graham, Emily B. and Dana, Karl L. and Ilhardt, Peter D. and Fansler, Sarah J. and Chrisler, William B. and Cliff, John B. and Stegen, James C. and Moran, James J. and Bernstein, Hans C.},
abstractNote = {Microbial community succession is a fundamental process that affects underlying functions of almost all ecosystems; yet the roles and fates of the most abundant colonizers are often poorly understood. Does early abundance spur long term persistence? How do deterministic and stochastic processes influence the ecological contribution of colonizers? We performed a succession experiment within a hypersaline ecosystem to investigate how different processes contributed to the turnover of founder species. Bacterial and eukaryotic colonizers were identified during primary succession and tracked through a defined, 79-day biofilm maturation period using 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequencing in combination with high resolution imaging that utilized stable isotope tracers to evaluate successional patterns of primary producers and nitrogen fixers. The majority of the founder species did not maintain high abundance throughout succession. Species replacement (versus loss) was the dominant process shaping community succession. We also asked if different ecological processes acted on bacteria versus Eukaryotes during succession and found deterministic and stochastic forces corresponded more with microeukaryote and bacterial colonization, respectively. Our results show that taxa and functions belonging to different kingdoms, which share habitat in the tight spatial confines of a biofilm, were influenced by different ecological processes and time scales of succession.},
doi = {10.1038/s41396-019-0396-x},
journal = {The ISME Journal},
number = 7,
volume = 13,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {7}
}

Works referenced in this record:

Estimating prokaryotic diversity and its limits
journal, July 2002

  • Curtis, T. P.; Sloan, W. T.; Scannell, J. W.
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 99, Issue 16, p. 10494-10499
  • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.142680199