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Title: Extreme temperature and precipitation response to solar dimming and stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

Abstract

We examine extreme temperature and precipitation under two potential geoengineering methods forming part of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). The solar dimming experiment G1 is designed to completely offset the global mean radiative forcing due to a CO 2-quadrupling experiment (abrupt4 × CO2), while in GeoMIP experiment G4, the radiative forcing due to the representative concentration pathway 4.5 (RCP4.5) scenario is partly offset by a simulated layer of aerosols in the stratosphere. Both G1 and G4 geoengineering simulations lead to lower minimum temperatures (TNn) at higher latitudes and on land, primarily through feedback effects involving high-latitude processes such as snow cover, sea ice and soil moisture. There is larger cooling of TNn and maximum temperatures (TXx) over land compared with oceans, and the land–sea cooling contrast is larger for TXx than TNn. Maximum 5-day precipitation (Rx5day) increases over subtropical oceans, whereas warm spells (WSDI) decrease markedly in the tropics, and the number of consecutive dry days (CDDs) decreases in most deserts. The precipitation during the tropical cyclone (hurricane) seasons becomes less intense, whilst the remainder of the year becomes wetter. Stratospheric aerosol injection is more effective than solar dimming in moderating extreme precipitation (and flooding). Despite the magnitude ofmore » the radiative forcing applied in G1 being ~7.7 times larger than in G4 and despite differences in the aerosol chemistry and transport schemes amongst the models, the two types of geoengineering show similar spatial patterns in normalized differences in extreme temperatures changes. Large differences mainly occur at northern high latitudes, where stratospheric aerosol injection more effectively reduces TNn and TXx. While the pattern of normalized differences in extreme precipitation is more complex than that of extreme temperatures, generally stratospheric aerosol injection is more effective in reducing tropical Rx5day, while solar dimming is more effective over extra-tropical regions.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5];  [6]; ORCiD logo [7]; ORCiD logo [8];  [9]
  1. Beijing Normal Univ. (China)
  2. Univ. of Victoria, BC (Canada)
  3. Kobe Univ. (Japan)
  4. Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama (Japan)
  5. Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Victoria, BC (Canada)
  6. Oceans and Atmosphere, Hobart, Tasmania (Australia)
  7. Univ. of Oslo (Norway); Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)
  8. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  9. Beijing Normal Univ. (China); Univ. of Lapland, Rovaniemi (Finland); CAS Center for Excellence in Tibetan Plateau Earth Sciences, Beijing (China)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1556906
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-132309
Journal ID: ISSN 1680-7324
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 14; Journal ID: ISSN 1680-7324
Publisher:
European Geosciences Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES

Citation Formats

Ji, Duoying, Fang, Songsong, Curry, Charles L., Kashimura, Hiroki, Watanabe, Shingo, Cole, Jason N. S., Lenton, Andrew, Muri, Helene, Kravitz, Benjamin S., and Moore, John C. Extreme temperature and precipitation response to solar dimming and stratospheric aerosol geoengineering. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.5194/acp-18-10133-2018.
Ji, Duoying, Fang, Songsong, Curry, Charles L., Kashimura, Hiroki, Watanabe, Shingo, Cole, Jason N. S., Lenton, Andrew, Muri, Helene, Kravitz, Benjamin S., & Moore, John C. Extreme temperature and precipitation response to solar dimming and stratospheric aerosol geoengineering. United States. https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-10133-2018
Ji, Duoying, Fang, Songsong, Curry, Charles L., Kashimura, Hiroki, Watanabe, Shingo, Cole, Jason N. S., Lenton, Andrew, Muri, Helene, Kravitz, Benjamin S., and Moore, John C. Wed . "Extreme temperature and precipitation response to solar dimming and stratospheric aerosol geoengineering". United States. https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-10133-2018. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1556906.
@article{osti_1556906,
title = {Extreme temperature and precipitation response to solar dimming and stratospheric aerosol geoengineering},
author = {Ji, Duoying and Fang, Songsong and Curry, Charles L. and Kashimura, Hiroki and Watanabe, Shingo and Cole, Jason N. S. and Lenton, Andrew and Muri, Helene and Kravitz, Benjamin S. and Moore, John C.},
abstractNote = {We examine extreme temperature and precipitation under two potential geoengineering methods forming part of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). The solar dimming experiment G1 is designed to completely offset the global mean radiative forcing due to a CO2-quadrupling experiment (abrupt4 × CO2), while in GeoMIP experiment G4, the radiative forcing due to the representative concentration pathway 4.5 (RCP4.5) scenario is partly offset by a simulated layer of aerosols in the stratosphere. Both G1 and G4 geoengineering simulations lead to lower minimum temperatures (TNn) at higher latitudes and on land, primarily through feedback effects involving high-latitude processes such as snow cover, sea ice and soil moisture. There is larger cooling of TNn and maximum temperatures (TXx) over land compared with oceans, and the land–sea cooling contrast is larger for TXx than TNn. Maximum 5-day precipitation (Rx5day) increases over subtropical oceans, whereas warm spells (WSDI) decrease markedly in the tropics, and the number of consecutive dry days (CDDs) decreases in most deserts. The precipitation during the tropical cyclone (hurricane) seasons becomes less intense, whilst the remainder of the year becomes wetter. Stratospheric aerosol injection is more effective than solar dimming in moderating extreme precipitation (and flooding). Despite the magnitude of the radiative forcing applied in G1 being ~7.7 times larger than in G4 and despite differences in the aerosol chemistry and transport schemes amongst the models, the two types of geoengineering show similar spatial patterns in normalized differences in extreme temperatures changes. Large differences mainly occur at northern high latitudes, where stratospheric aerosol injection more effectively reduces TNn and TXx. While the pattern of normalized differences in extreme precipitation is more complex than that of extreme temperatures, generally stratospheric aerosol injection is more effective in reducing tropical Rx5day, while solar dimming is more effective over extra-tropical regions.},
doi = {10.5194/acp-18-10133-2018},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1556906}, journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online)},
issn = {1680-7324},
number = 14,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {7}
}

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    Works referencing / citing this record:

    Effects of global warming and solar geoengineering on precipitation seasonality
    journal, March 2019


    Global streamflow and flood response to stratospheric aerosol geoengineering
    journal, January 2018