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Title: The De-Icing Comparison Experiment – ARM Contribution (DICEXACO) Field Campaign Report

Abstract

Longwave and shortwave radiative fluxes are fundamental quantities regularly observed globally using broadband radiometers. In regions conducive to frost, rime, and snow, ice frequently builds up on sensor windows, contaminating measurements. Since icing occurs under particular meteorological conditions, associated data loss constitutes a climatological bias. Furthermore, the signal caused by ice is difficult to distinguish from that of clouds, hampering efforts to identify contaminated data in post-processing. Because of the sensitivity of radiometers to internal temperature instabilities, there are limitations to using heat as a de-icing method, and consequently substantial amounts of data are lost. The De-Icing Comparison Experiment (D-ICE) was a campaign carried out at $$Utqia\dot{g}vik$$ (formerly known as Barrow) and Oliktok Point, Alaska, from August 2017 to July 2018. The purpose of D-ICE was to evaluate ventilation and heating technologies developed to mitigate radiometer icing. D-ICE consisted of 20 pyranometers and 5 pyrgeometers operating in various ventilator housings alongside operational stations run by the NOAA Global Monitoring Division (GMD) at NOAA’s Barrow Atmospheric Baseline Observatory. D-ICE also evaluated the sky radiometer (SKYRAD) systems at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Oliktok Point (OLI; third ARM Mobile Facility [AMF3]) observatories. In total, 34 systems were evaluated (8 of which were SKYRAD radiometers). All radiometers were monitored continuously using cameras, and a total of more than one million images of sensor domes were archived collectively between the stations. Data collected as part of D-ICE by NOAA can be found through the project web page, https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/arctic/d-ice/. The DICEXACO component of D-ICE (https://www.arm.gov/research/campaigns/nsa2017dicexaco) are the images collected at 10-min intervals at both OLI and NSA and are the subject of this report. Two cameras were installed at each ARM station, one directed towards the SKYRAD tracker and the other towards the SKYRAD global precision spectral pyranometer (PSP).

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]; ;  [3]
  1. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES)
  2. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.
  3. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOE Office of Science Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Contributing Org.:
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, University of Colorado
OSTI Identifier:
1548399
Report Number(s):
DOE/SC-ARM-19-020
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-ACO5-7601830
Resource Type:
Program Document
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Oliktok Point, North Slope of Alaska, SKYRAD, pyranometer, pyrgeometer, radiometers, data quality

Citation Formats

Cox, Christopher J, Morris, Sara M, Uttal, Taneil, Long, Charles N, and McComiskey, Allison. The De-Icing Comparison Experiment – ARM Contribution (DICEXACO) Field Campaign Report. United States: N. p., 2019. Web.
Cox, Christopher J, Morris, Sara M, Uttal, Taneil, Long, Charles N, & McComiskey, Allison. The De-Icing Comparison Experiment – ARM Contribution (DICEXACO) Field Campaign Report. United States.
Cox, Christopher J, Morris, Sara M, Uttal, Taneil, Long, Charles N, and McComiskey, Allison. Fri . "The De-Icing Comparison Experiment – ARM Contribution (DICEXACO) Field Campaign Report". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1548399.
@article{osti_1548399,
title = {The De-Icing Comparison Experiment – ARM Contribution (DICEXACO) Field Campaign Report},
author = {Cox, Christopher J and Morris, Sara M and Uttal, Taneil and Long, Charles N and McComiskey, Allison},
abstractNote = {Longwave and shortwave radiative fluxes are fundamental quantities regularly observed globally using broadband radiometers. In regions conducive to frost, rime, and snow, ice frequently builds up on sensor windows, contaminating measurements. Since icing occurs under particular meteorological conditions, associated data loss constitutes a climatological bias. Furthermore, the signal caused by ice is difficult to distinguish from that of clouds, hampering efforts to identify contaminated data in post-processing. Because of the sensitivity of radiometers to internal temperature instabilities, there are limitations to using heat as a de-icing method, and consequently substantial amounts of data are lost. The De-Icing Comparison Experiment (D-ICE) was a campaign carried out at $Utqia\dot{g}vik$ (formerly known as Barrow) and Oliktok Point, Alaska, from August 2017 to July 2018. The purpose of D-ICE was to evaluate ventilation and heating technologies developed to mitigate radiometer icing. D-ICE consisted of 20 pyranometers and 5 pyrgeometers operating in various ventilator housings alongside operational stations run by the NOAA Global Monitoring Division (GMD) at NOAA’s Barrow Atmospheric Baseline Observatory. D-ICE also evaluated the sky radiometer (SKYRAD) systems at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Oliktok Point (OLI; third ARM Mobile Facility [AMF3]) observatories. In total, 34 systems were evaluated (8 of which were SKYRAD radiometers). All radiometers were monitored continuously using cameras, and a total of more than one million images of sensor domes were archived collectively between the stations. Data collected as part of D-ICE by NOAA can be found through the project web page, https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/arctic/d-ice/. The DICEXACO component of D-ICE (https://www.arm.gov/research/campaigns/nsa2017dicexaco) are the images collected at 10-min intervals at both OLI and NSA and are the subject of this report. Two cameras were installed at each ARM station, one directed towards the SKYRAD tracker and the other towards the SKYRAD global precision spectral pyranometer (PSP).},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {8}
}

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