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Title: Big Area Additive Manufacturing Application in Wind Turbine Molds

Abstract

Tooling is a primary target for current additive manufacturing (AM), or 3D printing, technology because of its rapid prototyping capabilities. Molds of many sizes and shapes have been produced for a variety of industries. However, large tooling remained out of reach until the development of large-scale composite AM manufacturing processes like the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) system. The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) worked with TPI Composites to use the BAAM system to fabricate a wind turbine blade mold. The fabricated wind turbine blade mold was produced in 16 additively manufactured sections, was 13 meters long, had heating channels integrated into the design, and was mounted into a steel frame post fabrication. This research effort serves as a case study to examine the technological impacts of AM on wind turbine blade tooling and evaluate the efficacy of this approach in utility scale wind turbine manufacturing.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3]; ORCiD logo [3]
  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory
  2. TPI Composites, Inc.
  3. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Advanced Manufacturing Office (EE-5A); USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1548257
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-6A20-74522
DOE Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the 28th Annual International Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium - An Additive Manufacturing Conference, 7-9 August 2017, Austin, Texas
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; 42 ENGINEERING; additive manufacturing; 3D printing; wind turbines; molds

Citation Formats

Post, Brian K., Richardson, Bradley, Lind, Randall, Love, Lonnie J., Lloyd, Peter, Kunc, Vlastimil, Rhyne, Breanna J., Roschli, Alex, Hannan, Jim, Nolet, Steve, Veloso, Kevin, Kurup, Parthiv, Remo, Timothy W, and Jenne, Dale S. Big Area Additive Manufacturing Application in Wind Turbine Molds. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Post, Brian K., Richardson, Bradley, Lind, Randall, Love, Lonnie J., Lloyd, Peter, Kunc, Vlastimil, Rhyne, Breanna J., Roschli, Alex, Hannan, Jim, Nolet, Steve, Veloso, Kevin, Kurup, Parthiv, Remo, Timothy W, & Jenne, Dale S. Big Area Additive Manufacturing Application in Wind Turbine Molds. United States.
Post, Brian K., Richardson, Bradley, Lind, Randall, Love, Lonnie J., Lloyd, Peter, Kunc, Vlastimil, Rhyne, Breanna J., Roschli, Alex, Hannan, Jim, Nolet, Steve, Veloso, Kevin, Kurup, Parthiv, Remo, Timothy W, and Jenne, Dale S. Wed . "Big Area Additive Manufacturing Application in Wind Turbine Molds". United States.
@article{osti_1548257,
title = {Big Area Additive Manufacturing Application in Wind Turbine Molds},
author = {Post, Brian K. and Richardson, Bradley and Lind, Randall and Love, Lonnie J. and Lloyd, Peter and Kunc, Vlastimil and Rhyne, Breanna J. and Roschli, Alex and Hannan, Jim and Nolet, Steve and Veloso, Kevin and Kurup, Parthiv and Remo, Timothy W and Jenne, Dale S},
abstractNote = {Tooling is a primary target for current additive manufacturing (AM), or 3D printing, technology because of its rapid prototyping capabilities. Molds of many sizes and shapes have been produced for a variety of industries. However, large tooling remained out of reach until the development of large-scale composite AM manufacturing processes like the Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) system. The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) worked with TPI Composites to use the BAAM system to fabricate a wind turbine blade mold. The fabricated wind turbine blade mold was produced in 16 additively manufactured sections, was 13 meters long, had heating channels integrated into the design, and was mounted into a steel frame post fabrication. This research effort serves as a case study to examine the technological impacts of AM on wind turbine blade tooling and evaluate the efficacy of this approach in utility scale wind turbine manufacturing.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {8}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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