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Title: Transformational Reduction Using Sealing Technology in LCOE Reduction for Coal

Abstract

PROJECT OBJECTIVES GE Power (GEP), in partnership with GE Global Research (GEGR), are working to mature, implement and commercialize sealing technologies for coal-fired steam power plants to reduce the heat rate of a coal-fired plant by 0.6% points and to reduce the installation cost of new plants by about $3.8M. The overall objective is to use sealing technologies to drive a step change in the performance, efficiency, and cost of electricity of new as well as existing coal-based power plants, which aligns with the goals of the DOE. The program objectives are the maturation of sealing technologies to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6, followed by their implementation in an existing operating coal-fired steam turbine to validate performance and reach TRL8, and then obtain running experience to reach TRL9 and drive commercialization. These technologies have either already been developed or are being actively developed at lab-scale in ongoing DOE-funded programs and at private expense. METHODS TO BE EMPLOYED The sealing technologies proposed include low-pressure film-riding carbon end seals, high-pressure hybrid end face seals, hybrid radial interstage seals, rotating brush seals, valve stem seals, and tip balance slits. The shaft end and valve seals will reduce the cost of a new plantmore » by eliminating a steam gland condenser and reducing the size of the auxiliary boiler, eliminating piping runs for valve leak-offs, and shortening the rotor and thus the whole turbine. The shaft end face seals, interstage seals, and blade tip seals have a direct impact on the turbine's heat rate through leakage reduction. During Phase I the hybrid face and hybrid radial seals were matured as part of an on-going DOE-funded program with the face seal expected to reach TRL6 in a CO2 environment, and the carbon seal were matured to TRL6 for a steam turbine. The type of steam turbine plant that will make a suitable test bed was identified. A key aspect of the proposed approach is the use of an existing power-plant for validation and demonstration, thereby resulting in significantly lower development costs to achieve the goals of the FOA. A customer has been found to participate in the field trial: Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, Inc. will allow the field trial to take place at the Craig Plant in Hayden Colorado on Unit 3. Craig 3 is a 428 MW D8, which is a GE turbine code type for an opposed flow high pressure-intermediate pressure (HP-IP) section with a double-flow low-pressure section. The turbine was installed in 1984 and uprated with a Dense Pack HP-IP section in 2005. A maintenance outage is planned for the spring of 2021. Contingent on funding, Phase II of the project will see the completion of the sealing technology maturation and the seal designs for the target turbine. In Phase III the turbine interfaces will be de-signed, parts fabricated, and installed with the new technologies. On start-up a performance test will be carried out. After a year of operation, the performance test will be repeated. In this manner, performance and design robustness will be validated. POTENTIAL IMPACT The expected result at the conclusion of the three-phase effort is that these technologies will be fully validated in terms of performance benefit and design robustness. They will be available commercially for new coal plants and as upgrades for the existing US-based coal fleet. With slightly different performance impacts, they will also be applicable to combined cycle power plants.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
General Electric Company, Boston, MA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE / NETL
Contributing Org.:
GE Global Research
OSTI Identifier:
1547015
Report Number(s):
DOE-GEP-0031586
DOE Contract Number:  
FE0031586
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; Steam seals; Coal-fired power plant; Sealing technology

Citation Formats

Wolfe, Christopher, and Frutschy, Kristopher. Transformational Reduction Using Sealing Technology in LCOE Reduction for Coal. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1547015.
Wolfe, Christopher, & Frutschy, Kristopher. Transformational Reduction Using Sealing Technology in LCOE Reduction for Coal. United States. doi:10.2172/1547015.
Wolfe, Christopher, and Frutschy, Kristopher. Tue . "Transformational Reduction Using Sealing Technology in LCOE Reduction for Coal". United States. doi:10.2172/1547015. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1547015.
@article{osti_1547015,
title = {Transformational Reduction Using Sealing Technology in LCOE Reduction for Coal},
author = {Wolfe, Christopher and Frutschy, Kristopher},
abstractNote = {PROJECT OBJECTIVES GE Power (GEP), in partnership with GE Global Research (GEGR), are working to mature, implement and commercialize sealing technologies for coal-fired steam power plants to reduce the heat rate of a coal-fired plant by 0.6% points and to reduce the installation cost of new plants by about $3.8M. The overall objective is to use sealing technologies to drive a step change in the performance, efficiency, and cost of electricity of new as well as existing coal-based power plants, which aligns with the goals of the DOE. The program objectives are the maturation of sealing technologies to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6, followed by their implementation in an existing operating coal-fired steam turbine to validate performance and reach TRL8, and then obtain running experience to reach TRL9 and drive commercialization. These technologies have either already been developed or are being actively developed at lab-scale in ongoing DOE-funded programs and at private expense. METHODS TO BE EMPLOYED The sealing technologies proposed include low-pressure film-riding carbon end seals, high-pressure hybrid end face seals, hybrid radial interstage seals, rotating brush seals, valve stem seals, and tip balance slits. The shaft end and valve seals will reduce the cost of a new plant by eliminating a steam gland condenser and reducing the size of the auxiliary boiler, eliminating piping runs for valve leak-offs, and shortening the rotor and thus the whole turbine. The shaft end face seals, interstage seals, and blade tip seals have a direct impact on the turbine's heat rate through leakage reduction. During Phase I the hybrid face and hybrid radial seals were matured as part of an on-going DOE-funded program with the face seal expected to reach TRL6 in a CO2 environment, and the carbon seal were matured to TRL6 for a steam turbine. The type of steam turbine plant that will make a suitable test bed was identified. A key aspect of the proposed approach is the use of an existing power-plant for validation and demonstration, thereby resulting in significantly lower development costs to achieve the goals of the FOA. A customer has been found to participate in the field trial: Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, Inc. will allow the field trial to take place at the Craig Plant in Hayden Colorado on Unit 3. Craig 3 is a 428 MW D8, which is a GE turbine code type for an opposed flow high pressure-intermediate pressure (HP-IP) section with a double-flow low-pressure section. The turbine was installed in 1984 and uprated with a Dense Pack HP-IP section in 2005. A maintenance outage is planned for the spring of 2021. Contingent on funding, Phase II of the project will see the completion of the sealing technology maturation and the seal designs for the target turbine. In Phase III the turbine interfaces will be de-signed, parts fabricated, and installed with the new technologies. On start-up a performance test will be carried out. After a year of operation, the performance test will be repeated. In this manner, performance and design robustness will be validated. POTENTIAL IMPACT The expected result at the conclusion of the three-phase effort is that these technologies will be fully validated in terms of performance benefit and design robustness. They will be available commercially for new coal plants and as upgrades for the existing US-based coal fleet. With slightly different performance impacts, they will also be applicable to combined cycle power plants.},
doi = {10.2172/1547015},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {8}
}