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Title: Basic Research Needs for Microelectronics (Brochure)

Abstract

Since the invention of the integrated circuit in 1958, advances in microelectronics have followed Moore’s law and other scaling laws. These have led to over a billion-fold increase in the number of transistors on a chip. The Department of Energy’s Office of Science (DOE-SC) programs have always been at the cutting edge of microelectronics, making major contributions to the scientific understanding, materials, and advanced instrumentation that enabled innovations to promote scaling. This has driven transformative advances in microelectronics for the challenging demands of DOE’s high performance computing and science facilities. Now, strong evidence exists that scaling is approaching its physical and economic limits, and yet, the growth of data-centric computing and sensor networks is redefining computing workloads and microelectronics needs. In addition, greatly improved microelectronics are needed for the nation’s electricity grid if it is to be energy-efficient, resilient to natural phenomena and intentional attack, and agile in adapting to fluctuations in demand and power generation. Sustained and rapid progress in microelectronics science and technology from millivolt to megavolt scales is thus essential if we are to continue pushing the boundaries of science within DOE, and more significantly, to continue to lead the global information and power technology revolution. Inmore » October 2018, DOE-SC convened a workshop to address Basic Research Needs for Microelectronics by a “co-design” approach. Participants focused on scientific issues associated with advanced microelectronics technologies for applications relevant to the DOE mission, including computing, power grid management, and science facility workloads. (Topics of direct relevance to quantum information science and quantum computing were outside the scope of this workshop.) The workshop was organized around microelectronics needs for three areas: 1) future DOE-SC facilities, 2) high performance computing beyond exascale (a billion billion calculations per second), and 3) power control, conversion, and detection for a modernized electrical grid and related high power applications. Panels were formed around each of these areas, with a fourth panel formed to address Crosscutting Research. Workshop participants were asked to focus on a co-design innovation ecosystem in which materials, chemistries, devices, systems, architectures, algorithms, and software are researched and developed in a closely integrated fashion, with feedback and interdisciplinary collaboration at each interface in this microelectronics technology hierarchy. The panels identified the five Priority Research Directions on the following page.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC) (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1545772
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; 97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING

Citation Formats

None, None. Basic Research Needs for Microelectronics (Brochure). United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1545772.
None, None. Basic Research Needs for Microelectronics (Brochure). United States. doi:10.2172/1545772.
None, None. Mon . "Basic Research Needs for Microelectronics (Brochure)". United States. doi:10.2172/1545772. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1545772.
@article{osti_1545772,
title = {Basic Research Needs for Microelectronics (Brochure)},
author = {None, None},
abstractNote = {Since the invention of the integrated circuit in 1958, advances in microelectronics have followed Moore’s law and other scaling laws. These have led to over a billion-fold increase in the number of transistors on a chip. The Department of Energy’s Office of Science (DOE-SC) programs have always been at the cutting edge of microelectronics, making major contributions to the scientific understanding, materials, and advanced instrumentation that enabled innovations to promote scaling. This has driven transformative advances in microelectronics for the challenging demands of DOE’s high performance computing and science facilities. Now, strong evidence exists that scaling is approaching its physical and economic limits, and yet, the growth of data-centric computing and sensor networks is redefining computing workloads and microelectronics needs. In addition, greatly improved microelectronics are needed for the nation’s electricity grid if it is to be energy-efficient, resilient to natural phenomena and intentional attack, and agile in adapting to fluctuations in demand and power generation. Sustained and rapid progress in microelectronics science and technology from millivolt to megavolt scales is thus essential if we are to continue pushing the boundaries of science within DOE, and more significantly, to continue to lead the global information and power technology revolution. In October 2018, DOE-SC convened a workshop to address Basic Research Needs for Microelectronics by a “co-design” approach. Participants focused on scientific issues associated with advanced microelectronics technologies for applications relevant to the DOE mission, including computing, power grid management, and science facility workloads. (Topics of direct relevance to quantum information science and quantum computing were outside the scope of this workshop.) The workshop was organized around microelectronics needs for three areas: 1) future DOE-SC facilities, 2) high performance computing beyond exascale (a billion billion calculations per second), and 3) power control, conversion, and detection for a modernized electrical grid and related high power applications. Panels were formed around each of these areas, with a fourth panel formed to address Crosscutting Research. Workshop participants were asked to focus on a co-design innovation ecosystem in which materials, chemistries, devices, systems, architectures, algorithms, and software are researched and developed in a closely integrated fashion, with feedback and interdisciplinary collaboration at each interface in this microelectronics technology hierarchy. The panels identified the five Priority Research Directions on the following page.},
doi = {10.2172/1545772},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {10}
}