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Title: Introduction: Posttranslational Protein Modification

Abstract

Our genome encodes about 20,000 genes, which are transcribed into mRNA and then translated into proteins. Proteins perform numerous biochemical functions and are central for all life processes, including metabolism, signal transduction, transcription, translation, cellular structural integrity, and cell movement. A common feature of all living organisms is the ability to adapt to and survive the changing environment. In order to respond to environmental changes, the proteins of a living organism, or the proteome, must change. New proteins may need to be synthesized to deal with an environmental stress. At the same time, existing proteins can undergo certain chemical modifications, commonly referred to as protein post-translational modifications (PTMs), which introduce structural changes in proteins and thus produce signal responses.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]
  1. Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)
  2. Scripps Research Inst., Jupiter, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory-National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1545633
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Chemical Reviews
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 118; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 0009-2665
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Lin, Hening, and Caroll, Kate S. Introduction: Posttranslational Protein Modification. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.chemrev.7b00756.
Lin, Hening, & Caroll, Kate S. Introduction: Posttranslational Protein Modification. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.chemrev.7b00756.
Lin, Hening, and Caroll, Kate S. Thu . "Introduction: Posttranslational Protein Modification". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.chemrev.7b00756.
@article{osti_1545633,
title = {Introduction: Posttranslational Protein Modification},
author = {Lin, Hening and Caroll, Kate S.},
abstractNote = {Our genome encodes about 20,000 genes, which are transcribed into mRNA and then translated into proteins. Proteins perform numerous biochemical functions and are central for all life processes, including metabolism, signal transduction, transcription, translation, cellular structural integrity, and cell movement. A common feature of all living organisms is the ability to adapt to and survive the changing environment. In order to respond to environmental changes, the proteins of a living organism, or the proteome, must change. New proteins may need to be synthesized to deal with an environmental stress. At the same time, existing proteins can undergo certain chemical modifications, commonly referred to as protein post-translational modifications (PTMs), which introduce structural changes in proteins and thus produce signal responses.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.chemrev.7b00756},
journal = {Chemical Reviews},
issn = {0009-2665},
number = 3,
volume = 118,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}