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Title: Persistence of Chromate in Vadose Zone and Aquifer Sediments in Hanford, Washington

Abstract

This study of vadose zone and aquifer sediments beneath a former dichromate spill site showed that the persistence of CrVI in the sediments and the large differences in release rate was caused by the presence of multiple CrVI surface phases. Vadose zone sediments contained numerous 1 to 10 micron high solubility calcium chromate crystals, with lesser amounts of unidentified phases indicated by Ba/Cr association in weathered pyroxenes and Ca/Cr association in weathered Ca-rich plagioclase. Most of the CrVI mass in these vadose zone sediments was readily leached in laboratory columns at very high concentrations (up to 187 mg/L CrVI) likely from the highly soluble calcium chromate that was present. Additional CrVI associated with other CrVI surface phases was additionally slowly released over 100s of hours. The source of Ca and Ba for the CrVI precipitates may be from mineral dissolution associated with the historical surface spills of CrVI as an acidic dichromate solution. In contrast, aquifer sediments contained significantly less CrVI, which was slowly released over 100s of hours. Small-sized CrVI-containing precipitates (< 5 micron) were associated with Fe, Ca, and, to a lesser extent, Ba. Leaching with groundwater caused a decrease in ferrous iron surface phases. The observed leachingmore » of CrVI from vadose zone and aquifer sediments has created a continuous source of CrVI to groundwater.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)
  2. CH2M HILL INC
  3. Florida International University
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1543269
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-141530
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Science of the Total Environment
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 676
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
chromium, groundwater contamination, vadose zone contamination, slow release

Citation Formats

Szecsody, James E., Truex, Michael J., Qafoku, Nikolla, McKinley, James P., Ivarson, Kristine A., and Di Pietro, Silvina. Persistence of Chromate in Vadose Zone and Aquifer Sediments in Hanford, Washington. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.04.173.
Szecsody, James E., Truex, Michael J., Qafoku, Nikolla, McKinley, James P., Ivarson, Kristine A., & Di Pietro, Silvina. Persistence of Chromate in Vadose Zone and Aquifer Sediments in Hanford, Washington. United States. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.04.173.
Szecsody, James E., Truex, Michael J., Qafoku, Nikolla, McKinley, James P., Ivarson, Kristine A., and Di Pietro, Silvina. Thu . "Persistence of Chromate in Vadose Zone and Aquifer Sediments in Hanford, Washington". United States. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.04.173.
@article{osti_1543269,
title = {Persistence of Chromate in Vadose Zone and Aquifer Sediments in Hanford, Washington},
author = {Szecsody, James E. and Truex, Michael J. and Qafoku, Nikolla and McKinley, James P. and Ivarson, Kristine A. and Di Pietro, Silvina},
abstractNote = {This study of vadose zone and aquifer sediments beneath a former dichromate spill site showed that the persistence of CrVI in the sediments and the large differences in release rate was caused by the presence of multiple CrVI surface phases. Vadose zone sediments contained numerous 1 to 10 micron high solubility calcium chromate crystals, with lesser amounts of unidentified phases indicated by Ba/Cr association in weathered pyroxenes and Ca/Cr association in weathered Ca-rich plagioclase. Most of the CrVI mass in these vadose zone sediments was readily leached in laboratory columns at very high concentrations (up to 187 mg/L CrVI) likely from the highly soluble calcium chromate that was present. Additional CrVI associated with other CrVI surface phases was additionally slowly released over 100s of hours. The source of Ca and Ba for the CrVI precipitates may be from mineral dissolution associated with the historical surface spills of CrVI as an acidic dichromate solution. In contrast, aquifer sediments contained significantly less CrVI, which was slowly released over 100s of hours. Small-sized CrVI-containing precipitates (< 5 micron) were associated with Fe, Ca, and, to a lesser extent, Ba. Leaching with groundwater caused a decrease in ferrous iron surface phases. The observed leaching of CrVI from vadose zone and aquifer sediments has created a continuous source of CrVI to groundwater.},
doi = {10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.04.173},
journal = {Science of the Total Environment},
number = ,
volume = 676,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {8}
}