skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Comparing the Efficiency of In Situ Visualization Paradigms at Scale

Abstract

This work compares the two major paradigms for doing in situ visualization: in-line, where the simulation and visualization share the same resources, and in-transit, where simulation and visualization are given dedicated resources. Our runs vary many parameters, including simulation cycle time, visualization frequency, and dedicated resources, to study how tradeoffs change over configuration. In particular, we consider simulations as large as 1,024 nodes (16,384 cores) and dedicated visualization resources with as many as 512 nodes (8,192 cores). We draw conclusions about when each paradigm is superior, such as in-line being superior when the simulation cycle time is very fast. Surprisingly, we also find that in-transit can minimize the total resources consumed for some configurations, since it can cause the visualization routines to require fewer overall resources when they run at lower concurrency. For example, one of our scenarios finds that allocating 25% more resources for visualization allows the simulation to run 61% faster than its in-line comparator. Finally, we explore various models for quantifying the cost for each paradigm, and consider transition points when one paradigm is superior to the other. Our contributions inform design decisions for simulation scientists when performing in situ visualization.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [3]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. ORNL
  2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)
  3. University of Oregon
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) (SC-21)
OSTI Identifier:
1543212
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Volume: 11501; Conference: ISC High Performance - Frankfurt, , Germany - 6/16/2019 8:00:00 AM-6/20/2019 8:00:00 AM
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kress, James M., Larsen, Matthew, Choi, Jong Youl, Kim, Mark B., Wolf, Matthew D., Podhorszki, Norbert, Klasky, Scott A., Childs, Hank, and Pugmire, Dave. Comparing the Efficiency of In Situ Visualization Paradigms at Scale. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-20656-7_6.
Kress, James M., Larsen, Matthew, Choi, Jong Youl, Kim, Mark B., Wolf, Matthew D., Podhorszki, Norbert, Klasky, Scott A., Childs, Hank, & Pugmire, Dave. Comparing the Efficiency of In Situ Visualization Paradigms at Scale. United States. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-20656-7_6.
Kress, James M., Larsen, Matthew, Choi, Jong Youl, Kim, Mark B., Wolf, Matthew D., Podhorszki, Norbert, Klasky, Scott A., Childs, Hank, and Pugmire, Dave. Wed . "Comparing the Efficiency of In Situ Visualization Paradigms at Scale". United States. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-20656-7_6. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1543212.
@article{osti_1543212,
title = {Comparing the Efficiency of In Situ Visualization Paradigms at Scale},
author = {Kress, James M. and Larsen, Matthew and Choi, Jong Youl and Kim, Mark B. and Wolf, Matthew D. and Podhorszki, Norbert and Klasky, Scott A. and Childs, Hank and Pugmire, Dave},
abstractNote = {This work compares the two major paradigms for doing in situ visualization: in-line, where the simulation and visualization share the same resources, and in-transit, where simulation and visualization are given dedicated resources. Our runs vary many parameters, including simulation cycle time, visualization frequency, and dedicated resources, to study how tradeoffs change over configuration. In particular, we consider simulations as large as 1,024 nodes (16,384 cores) and dedicated visualization resources with as many as 512 nodes (8,192 cores). We draw conclusions about when each paradigm is superior, such as in-line being superior when the simulation cycle time is very fast. Surprisingly, we also find that in-transit can minimize the total resources consumed for some configurations, since it can cause the visualization routines to require fewer overall resources when they run at lower concurrency. For example, one of our scenarios finds that allocating 25% more resources for visualization allows the simulation to run 61% faster than its in-line comparator. Finally, we explore various models for quantifying the cost for each paradigm, and consider transition points when one paradigm is superior to the other. Our contributions inform design decisions for simulation scientists when performing in situ visualization.},
doi = {10.1007/978-3-030-20656-7_6},
journal = {},
issn = {0302-9743},
number = ,
volume = 11501,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {5}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:

Works referenced in this record:

Extreme Scaling of Production Visualization Software on Diverse Architectures
journal, May 2010

  • Childs, Hank; Pugmire, David; Ahern, Sean
  • IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, Vol. 30, Issue 3
  • DOI: 10.1109/MCG.2010.51

DataSpaces: an interaction and coordination framework for coupled simulation workflows
journal, February 2011


Hello ADIOS: the challenges and lessons of developing leadership class I/O frameworks: HELLO ADIOS
journal, August 2013

  • Liu, Qing; Logan, Jeremy; Tian, Yuan
  • Concurrency and Computation: Practice and Experience, Vol. 26, Issue 7
  • DOI: 10.1002/cpe.3125

VTK-m: Accelerating the Visualization Toolkit for Massively Threaded Architectures
journal, May 2016

  • Moreland, Kenneth; Sewell, Christopher; Usher, William
  • IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, Vol. 36, Issue 3
  • DOI: 10.1109/MCG.2016.48