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Title: EISA (Energy Independence and Security Act) compliant ethanol fuel from corn stover in a depot-based decentralized system

Abstract

Cellulosic biofuels face significant problems of feedstock aggregation and logistics leading to poor economies of scale. The current model is based on relatively small biorefineries using locally-gathered feedstocks. Here, we examine the potential capacity of a hypothetically distributed, depot-based, biorefinery system to produce cellulosic ethanol from corn stover in the United States Midwest. The local depots serve to aggregate, pretreat and densify biomass (via pellets), which are collected, transported, and fed to a few very large, cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. We found that a corn stover-based depot system would help establish one or two very large-scale biorefineries capable of processing about 8-12% of total corn stover available in the United States Midwest. About 55-153 depots could supply the pretreated pellets to each distributed biorefinery leading to an annual production of 1.02 - 2.91 billion liters of cellulosic ethanol. Most of the participating depots would be located in Illinois and Iowa. The ethanol selling price in this depot-based biorefinery system would varys between U$S 0.67 and U$S 0.72 liter-1. The estimated range of GHG savings from cellulosic ethanol in the depot system compared to gasoline was 3.35-4.84 Tg CO2 year-1. In addition of being economically competitive, a distributed, depot-based, biorefinery system couldmore » meet the 60% GHG reduction requirement of the U.S. Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA).« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [4]
  1. Michigan State University
  2. BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)
  3. University of Maryland
  4. University of Maryland at College Park
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1542063
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-134812
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Biofuels, Bioproducts & Biorefining
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 12; Journal Issue: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Biorefinery, Cellulosic biofuel, Corn stover, Distributed system, Depot, Global warming impact, Minimum ethanol selling price

Citation Formats

Kim, Seungdo, Zhang, Xuesong, Dale, Bruce E., Reddy, Ashwan D., Jones, Curtis D., and Izaurralde, Roberto C. EISA (Energy Independence and Security Act) compliant ethanol fuel from corn stover in a depot-based decentralized system. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1002/bbb.1899.
Kim, Seungdo, Zhang, Xuesong, Dale, Bruce E., Reddy, Ashwan D., Jones, Curtis D., & Izaurralde, Roberto C. EISA (Energy Independence and Security Act) compliant ethanol fuel from corn stover in a depot-based decentralized system. United States. doi:10.1002/bbb.1899.
Kim, Seungdo, Zhang, Xuesong, Dale, Bruce E., Reddy, Ashwan D., Jones, Curtis D., and Izaurralde, Roberto C. Sat . "EISA (Energy Independence and Security Act) compliant ethanol fuel from corn stover in a depot-based decentralized system". United States. doi:10.1002/bbb.1899.
@article{osti_1542063,
title = {EISA (Energy Independence and Security Act) compliant ethanol fuel from corn stover in a depot-based decentralized system},
author = {Kim, Seungdo and Zhang, Xuesong and Dale, Bruce E. and Reddy, Ashwan D. and Jones, Curtis D. and Izaurralde, Roberto C.},
abstractNote = {Cellulosic biofuels face significant problems of feedstock aggregation and logistics leading to poor economies of scale. The current model is based on relatively small biorefineries using locally-gathered feedstocks. Here, we examine the potential capacity of a hypothetically distributed, depot-based, biorefinery system to produce cellulosic ethanol from corn stover in the United States Midwest. The local depots serve to aggregate, pretreat and densify biomass (via pellets), which are collected, transported, and fed to a few very large, cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. We found that a corn stover-based depot system would help establish one or two very large-scale biorefineries capable of processing about 8-12% of total corn stover available in the United States Midwest. About 55-153 depots could supply the pretreated pellets to each distributed biorefinery leading to an annual production of 1.02 - 2.91 billion liters of cellulosic ethanol. Most of the participating depots would be located in Illinois and Iowa. The ethanol selling price in this depot-based biorefinery system would varys between U$S 0.67 and U$S 0.72 liter-1. The estimated range of GHG savings from cellulosic ethanol in the depot system compared to gasoline was 3.35-4.84 Tg CO2 year-1. In addition of being economically competitive, a distributed, depot-based, biorefinery system could meet the 60% GHG reduction requirement of the U.S. Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA).},
doi = {10.1002/bbb.1899},
journal = {Biofuels, Bioproducts & Biorefining},
number = 5,
volume = 12,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}