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Title: Effect of Gas Flow Rate on Hydrate Formation Within the Hydrate Stability Zone

Abstract

We form methane hydrate in brine-saturated, coarse-grained samples, under hydrate-stable conditions, by injecting methane vapor at various flow rates. Decreasing the flow rate results in higher hydrate saturation, lower brine saturation, a smaller affected volume, and larger average pressure differentials across the sample. We interpret that the longer execution times at lower flow rates allow for additional methane transport and hydrate formation at the hydrate-brine interface. As a result, the hydrate skin is thicker at lower flow rates and thus is capable of sustaining larger pressure differentials. In several experiments, we stop brine flow and supply methane gas to the sample for an additional 800 hrs. During this period, hydrate continues to form, pressure differentials develop, and the bulk density changes within the affected volume. We interpret that there is gas present in the sample that is disconnected from the gas source. Hydrate forms around the disconnected gas due to methane transport through the skin that surrounds it, causing the internal gas pressure to decline and leading to inward collapse and net volume decrease. This lowers the brine pressure and creates a differential pressure across the sample that induces gas flow. This study indicates that lower gas flow rates throughmore » the hydrate stability zone can produce very high saturations of hydrate but require a larger differential pressure to sustain flow. Ultimately, this process is an alternative mechanism for sustained upward gas flow and hydrate formation far above the base of the hydrate stability zone.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1539756
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1466843
Grant/Contract Number:  
FE0010406; FE0023919; FE0028967
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research. Solid Earth
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 123; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 2169-9313
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; Geochemistry & Geophysics

Citation Formats

Meyer, Dylan W., Flemings, Peter B., and DiCarlo, David. Effect of Gas Flow Rate on Hydrate Formation Within the Hydrate Stability Zone. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1029/2018jb015878.
Meyer, Dylan W., Flemings, Peter B., & DiCarlo, David. Effect of Gas Flow Rate on Hydrate Formation Within the Hydrate Stability Zone. United States. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018jb015878
Meyer, Dylan W., Flemings, Peter B., and DiCarlo, David. Sat . "Effect of Gas Flow Rate on Hydrate Formation Within the Hydrate Stability Zone". United States. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018jb015878. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1539756.
@article{osti_1539756,
title = {Effect of Gas Flow Rate on Hydrate Formation Within the Hydrate Stability Zone},
author = {Meyer, Dylan W. and Flemings, Peter B. and DiCarlo, David},
abstractNote = {We form methane hydrate in brine-saturated, coarse-grained samples, under hydrate-stable conditions, by injecting methane vapor at various flow rates. Decreasing the flow rate results in higher hydrate saturation, lower brine saturation, a smaller affected volume, and larger average pressure differentials across the sample. We interpret that the longer execution times at lower flow rates allow for additional methane transport and hydrate formation at the hydrate-brine interface. As a result, the hydrate skin is thicker at lower flow rates and thus is capable of sustaining larger pressure differentials. In several experiments, we stop brine flow and supply methane gas to the sample for an additional 800 hrs. During this period, hydrate continues to form, pressure differentials develop, and the bulk density changes within the affected volume. We interpret that there is gas present in the sample that is disconnected from the gas source. Hydrate forms around the disconnected gas due to methane transport through the skin that surrounds it, causing the internal gas pressure to decline and leading to inward collapse and net volume decrease. This lowers the brine pressure and creates a differential pressure across the sample that induces gas flow. This study indicates that lower gas flow rates through the hydrate stability zone can produce very high saturations of hydrate but require a larger differential pressure to sustain flow. Ultimately, this process is an alternative mechanism for sustained upward gas flow and hydrate formation far above the base of the hydrate stability zone.},
doi = {10.1029/2018jb015878},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1539756}, journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research. Solid Earth},
issn = {2169-9313},
number = 8,
volume = 123,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {8}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

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    Works referencing / citing this record:

    A preliminary study of the gas hydrate stability zone in a gas hydrate potential region of China
    journal, April 2020