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Title: NEUTRON-IRRADIATION–INDUCED DAMAGE ASSESSMENT IN CONCRETE USING COMBINED PHASE CHARACTERIZATION AND NONLINEAR FAST FOURIER TRANSFORM SIMULATION

Abstract

Understanding irradiation effects in concrete cavities of light water reactors is critical to the long-term operation (60+ years) of US nuclear power plants. Susceptibility of concrete to neutron irradiation greatly varies as a function of its constituents: coarse aggregates, sand, and hardened cement paste (hcp). In particular, higher irradiation–susceptibility of aggregates was found to be a direct function of radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE), or the propensity of aggregates to swell as a function of mineral contents, structures and textures. Irradiation-induced amorphization is accompanied by significant swelling, especially in silicates. For example, the maximum volumetric expansions of quartz and feldspars have been shown to be as large as ≈ 18% and ≈ 8%, respectively, while the change of density in calcite remains rather low (≈ 0.3–0.5%). High swelling is associated with a high number of covalent bonds (Si–O) and a high degree of polymerization of [SiO4] tetrahedrons. Differential RIVEs between rock-forming minerals cause high stresses and may potentially develop cracking within the aggregates at the interface between aggregates and the hcp and within the hcp. Modeling neutron-irradiation effects in concrete requires addressing the problem at a scale that captures both the details of the aggregates’ mineralogy and texture, which is <~more » 100 μm, and the representative size of concrete, which is ~ 10 cm. This requires high-resolution, large mapping capabilities. To this end, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program developed an original tool suite called Microstructure Oriented Scientific Analysis of Irradiated Concrete (MOSAIC) in which Nonlinear 2D-fast Fourier transform (FFT) techniques are employed to model mechanical or irradiation-induced cracking of high-resolution complex microstructures derived from combined mapping techniques, including micro x-ray fluorescence (m-XRF), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), ellipsometry, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Irradiated mineral properties are derived from the Irradiated Minerals, Aggregate and Concrete (IMAC) database, which includes available relevant literature data. Rigorous coupled damage-creep simulations are obtained through sequential linear analysis. Illustrations of actual accelerated irradiation-damage propagation in a complex microstructures are presented herein.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1531249
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 10th International Conference on Fracture Mechanics of Concrete and Concrete Structures - FraMCoS-X - Bayonne, , France - 6/24/2019 8:00:00 AM-6/26/2019 8:00:00 AM
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Le Pape, Yann, Tajuelo Rodriguez, Elena, Arregui Mena, Jose', Giorla, Alain B., Anovitz, Lawrence, and Rosseel, T. M. NEUTRON-IRRADIATION–INDUCED DAMAGE ASSESSMENT IN CONCRETE USING COMBINED PHASE CHARACTERIZATION AND NONLINEAR FAST FOURIER TRANSFORM SIMULATION. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.21012/FC10.232765.
Le Pape, Yann, Tajuelo Rodriguez, Elena, Arregui Mena, Jose', Giorla, Alain B., Anovitz, Lawrence, & Rosseel, T. M. NEUTRON-IRRADIATION–INDUCED DAMAGE ASSESSMENT IN CONCRETE USING COMBINED PHASE CHARACTERIZATION AND NONLINEAR FAST FOURIER TRANSFORM SIMULATION. United States. doi:10.21012/FC10.232765.
Le Pape, Yann, Tajuelo Rodriguez, Elena, Arregui Mena, Jose', Giorla, Alain B., Anovitz, Lawrence, and Rosseel, T. M. Sat . "NEUTRON-IRRADIATION–INDUCED DAMAGE ASSESSMENT IN CONCRETE USING COMBINED PHASE CHARACTERIZATION AND NONLINEAR FAST FOURIER TRANSFORM SIMULATION". United States. doi:10.21012/FC10.232765. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1531249.
@article{osti_1531249,
title = {NEUTRON-IRRADIATION–INDUCED DAMAGE ASSESSMENT IN CONCRETE USING COMBINED PHASE CHARACTERIZATION AND NONLINEAR FAST FOURIER TRANSFORM SIMULATION},
author = {Le Pape, Yann and Tajuelo Rodriguez, Elena and Arregui Mena, Jose' and Giorla, Alain B. and Anovitz, Lawrence and Rosseel, T. M.},
abstractNote = {Understanding irradiation effects in concrete cavities of light water reactors is critical to the long-term operation (60+ years) of US nuclear power plants. Susceptibility of concrete to neutron irradiation greatly varies as a function of its constituents: coarse aggregates, sand, and hardened cement paste (hcp). In particular, higher irradiation–susceptibility of aggregates was found to be a direct function of radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE), or the propensity of aggregates to swell as a function of mineral contents, structures and textures. Irradiation-induced amorphization is accompanied by significant swelling, especially in silicates. For example, the maximum volumetric expansions of quartz and feldspars have been shown to be as large as ≈ 18% and ≈ 8%, respectively, while the change of density in calcite remains rather low (≈ 0.3–0.5%). High swelling is associated with a high number of covalent bonds (Si–O) and a high degree of polymerization of [SiO4] tetrahedrons. Differential RIVEs between rock-forming minerals cause high stresses and may potentially develop cracking within the aggregates at the interface between aggregates and the hcp and within the hcp. Modeling neutron-irradiation effects in concrete requires addressing the problem at a scale that captures both the details of the aggregates’ mineralogy and texture, which is <~ 100 μm, and the representative size of concrete, which is ~ 10 cm. This requires high-resolution, large mapping capabilities. To this end, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program developed an original tool suite called Microstructure Oriented Scientific Analysis of Irradiated Concrete (MOSAIC) in which Nonlinear 2D-fast Fourier transform (FFT) techniques are employed to model mechanical or irradiation-induced cracking of high-resolution complex microstructures derived from combined mapping techniques, including micro x-ray fluorescence (m-XRF), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), ellipsometry, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Irradiated mineral properties are derived from the Irradiated Minerals, Aggregate and Concrete (IMAC) database, which includes available relevant literature data. Rigorous coupled damage-creep simulations are obtained through sequential linear analysis. Illustrations of actual accelerated irradiation-damage propagation in a complex microstructures are presented herein.},
doi = {10.21012/FC10.232765},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {6}
}

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