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Title: Submicron Sodium Banding in Cultured Planktic Foraminifera Shells

Abstract

The calcite shells, or tests, of foraminifera provide a window into Earth history because they are well preserved in marine sediments and contain useful geochemical proxies for paleoceanography. Previous observations of diurnal heterogeneity in proxies like Mg/Ca demonstrate a complex relationship between environmental conditions and test composition. The definitive causes for this diurnal banding and the potential impact for proxy interpretation in systems other than Mg/Ca have yet to be determined. Here we use time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), a chemical and isotope mapping technique with a spatial resolution of 300 nm, to show that Na banding is a consistent feature in the tests of cultured Orbulina universa, a species of planktic foraminifer. This banding occurs in two distinct forms: (1) sharp Na bands associated with embedded organic sheets and (2) regular, thicker, but lower-amplitude Na bands that are found throughout the test. In Orbulina bilobata, a morphotype of O. universa that develops a second partial spherical chamber attached to the primary sphere, we use the first type of banding to show that a second organic sheet is used as a template to form this second chamber. Thus, sodium banding links test geochemistry with foraminiferal growth models, allowing usmore » to explain the pattern and timing of chamber formation as well as a specific type of geochemical banding in foraminifera. Furthermore, the magnitude, timing, and coherency between Na and Mg bands can help constrain mechanistic explanations for geochemical banding in foraminifera in general.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7]
  1. WASHINGTON STATE UNIV
  2. BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)
  3. OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
  4. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS
  5. Columbia University
  6. University of California, Davis
  7. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1530586
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-142331
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 253
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
paleoclimate, Foraminifera, biomineralization, paleoproxies, metal-to-calciumb ratios, SIMS

Citation Formats

Bonnin, Elisa Angeles A., Zhu, Zihua, Fehrenbacher, Jennifer S., Russell, Ann D., Honisch, Barbel, Spero, Howard J., and Gagnon, Alexander C. Submicron Sodium Banding in Cultured Planktic Foraminifera Shells. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2019.03.024.
Bonnin, Elisa Angeles A., Zhu, Zihua, Fehrenbacher, Jennifer S., Russell, Ann D., Honisch, Barbel, Spero, Howard J., & Gagnon, Alexander C. Submicron Sodium Banding in Cultured Planktic Foraminifera Shells. United States. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2019.03.024.
Bonnin, Elisa Angeles A., Zhu, Zihua, Fehrenbacher, Jennifer S., Russell, Ann D., Honisch, Barbel, Spero, Howard J., and Gagnon, Alexander C. Wed . "Submicron Sodium Banding in Cultured Planktic Foraminifera Shells". United States. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2019.03.024.
@article{osti_1530586,
title = {Submicron Sodium Banding in Cultured Planktic Foraminifera Shells},
author = {Bonnin, Elisa Angeles A. and Zhu, Zihua and Fehrenbacher, Jennifer S. and Russell, Ann D. and Honisch, Barbel and Spero, Howard J. and Gagnon, Alexander C.},
abstractNote = {The calcite shells, or tests, of foraminifera provide a window into Earth history because they are well preserved in marine sediments and contain useful geochemical proxies for paleoceanography. Previous observations of diurnal heterogeneity in proxies like Mg/Ca demonstrate a complex relationship between environmental conditions and test composition. The definitive causes for this diurnal banding and the potential impact for proxy interpretation in systems other than Mg/Ca have yet to be determined. Here we use time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), a chemical and isotope mapping technique with a spatial resolution of 300 nm, to show that Na banding is a consistent feature in the tests of cultured Orbulina universa, a species of planktic foraminifer. This banding occurs in two distinct forms: (1) sharp Na bands associated with embedded organic sheets and (2) regular, thicker, but lower-amplitude Na bands that are found throughout the test. In Orbulina bilobata, a morphotype of O. universa that develops a second partial spherical chamber attached to the primary sphere, we use the first type of banding to show that a second organic sheet is used as a template to form this second chamber. Thus, sodium banding links test geochemistry with foraminiferal growth models, allowing us to explain the pattern and timing of chamber formation as well as a specific type of geochemical banding in foraminifera. Furthermore, the magnitude, timing, and coherency between Na and Mg bands can help constrain mechanistic explanations for geochemical banding in foraminifera in general.},
doi = {10.1016/j.gca.2019.03.024},
journal = {Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta},
number = ,
volume = 253,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {5}
}