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Title: Method for Separation of Coal Conversion Products from Sorbents/Oxygen Carriers

Abstract

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR/STTR) Phase 2 project targets the development of a novel system known as a Particle Char Separator (PCS), for segregating unburned char (and ash) from oxygen carrier (OC) materials leaving the fuel reactor (reducer) of Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) systems. This novel system will be capable of removing a high percentage (≈80 percent carbon removal in ≈20 percent of the material) of the unburned char and ash and returning it to the fuel reactor, thus increasing carbon capture efficiency and minimizing ash-OC interactions. The overall objective of the Phase II project was to 1) develop a continuous hot flow PCS system and evaluate its performance under relevant chemical looping conditions of temperature and reducing conditions, and 2) develop a better understanding of scale-up requirements and effect on performance of the system using a scaled up cold flow system. The PCS system comprises a Large Char Separator (LCS) which focuses on removal of carbon-rich particles greater than 150 microns and a Small Char Separator (SCS) which targets removal of smaller-sized particles. Experimental testing confirmed the PCS alone is capable of achieving 80 percent or more carbon removal with 20 to 30 percent of the solids. Charmore » particles with sizes that are similar or larger than the oxygen carrier (150 µm) were removed with efficiencies of 42 to 81 percent, while smaller char particles (less than 150 µm) were removed with higher efficiencies (44 to 99 percent). This range in performance suggests that tailoring of oxygen carrier and fuel particle sizes could be used to maximize separation. These results were obtained at relevant CLC temperatures (800°C) but equipment design limitations made testing under reducing conditions not feasible. Currently, the PCS system is being integrated with a 10 kW CLC system currently under development as part of a Department of Energy award (DE-FE0031534) to the University of North Dakota. The integration will allow for testing under actual CLC conditions and also includes equipment modifications expected to improve performance.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Envergex LLC
  2. University of North Dakota
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Envergex LLC
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1529893
Report Number(s):
DOE-ENVERGEX-SC0013832PhII
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0013832
Type / Phase:
STTR (Phase II)
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; Chemical Looping Combustion, Oxygen Carriers, Char Separation, CO2 Capture

Citation Formats

Srinivasachar, Srivats, Nelson, Teagan R, Nasah, Junior, Jensen, Benjamin R, and Mann, Michael D. Method for Separation of Coal Conversion Products from Sorbents/Oxygen Carriers. United States: N. p., 2019. Web.
Srinivasachar, Srivats, Nelson, Teagan R, Nasah, Junior, Jensen, Benjamin R, & Mann, Michael D. Method for Separation of Coal Conversion Products from Sorbents/Oxygen Carriers. United States.
Srinivasachar, Srivats, Nelson, Teagan R, Nasah, Junior, Jensen, Benjamin R, and Mann, Michael D. Fri . "Method for Separation of Coal Conversion Products from Sorbents/Oxygen Carriers". United States.
@article{osti_1529893,
title = {Method for Separation of Coal Conversion Products from Sorbents/Oxygen Carriers},
author = {Srinivasachar, Srivats and Nelson, Teagan R and Nasah, Junior and Jensen, Benjamin R and Mann, Michael D},
abstractNote = {This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR/STTR) Phase 2 project targets the development of a novel system known as a Particle Char Separator (PCS), for segregating unburned char (and ash) from oxygen carrier (OC) materials leaving the fuel reactor (reducer) of Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) systems. This novel system will be capable of removing a high percentage (≈80 percent carbon removal in ≈20 percent of the material) of the unburned char and ash and returning it to the fuel reactor, thus increasing carbon capture efficiency and minimizing ash-OC interactions. The overall objective of the Phase II project was to 1) develop a continuous hot flow PCS system and evaluate its performance under relevant chemical looping conditions of temperature and reducing conditions, and 2) develop a better understanding of scale-up requirements and effect on performance of the system using a scaled up cold flow system. The PCS system comprises a Large Char Separator (LCS) which focuses on removal of carbon-rich particles greater than 150 microns and a Small Char Separator (SCS) which targets removal of smaller-sized particles. Experimental testing confirmed the PCS alone is capable of achieving 80 percent or more carbon removal with 20 to 30 percent of the solids. Char particles with sizes that are similar or larger than the oxygen carrier (150 µm) were removed with efficiencies of 42 to 81 percent, while smaller char particles (less than 150 µm) were removed with higher efficiencies (44 to 99 percent). This range in performance suggests that tailoring of oxygen carrier and fuel particle sizes could be used to maximize separation. These results were obtained at relevant CLC temperatures (800°C) but equipment design limitations made testing under reducing conditions not feasible. Currently, the PCS system is being integrated with a 10 kW CLC system currently under development as part of a Department of Energy award (DE-FE0031534) to the University of North Dakota. The integration will allow for testing under actual CLC conditions and also includes equipment modifications expected to improve performance.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {6}
}

Technical Report:
This technical report may be released as soon as June 28, 2023
Other availability
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