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Title: Energy-Efficient CO 2 Capture from Flue Gas by Absorption with Amino Acids and Crystallization with a Bis-Iminoguanidine

Abstract

In this work, we report a hybrid solvent/solid-state approach to CO 2 separation from flue gas, consisting of absorption with aqueous glycine or sarcosine amino acids, followed by crystallization of the bicarbonate salt of glyoxal-bis(iminoguanidine) (GBIG), and subsequent solid-state CO 2 release from the bicarbonate crystals. In this process, the GBIG bicarbonate crystallization regenerates the amino acid sorbent at ambient temperature, and the CO 2 is subsequently released by mild heating (120 °C) of the GBIG bicarbonate crystals, which results in quantitative regeneration of GBIG. The cyclic capacities measured from multiple absorption–regeneration cycles are in the range of 0.2–0.3 mol CO 2/mol amino acid. The regeneration energy of this hybrid solvent/solid-state approach is 24% and 40% lower than the regeneration energy of benchmark industrial sorbents monoethanolamine and sodium glycinate, respectively. Lastly, as the amino acid sorbent is never heated in the hybrid process, its loss through evaporation or degradation is minimized.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22). Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division; USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Office of Technology Development (EE-20)
OSTI Identifier:
1528715
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 58; Journal Issue: 24; Journal ID: ISSN 0888-5885
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Garrabrant, Kathleen A., Williams, Neil J., Holguin, Erick, Brethome, Flavien M., Tsouris, Costas, and Custelcean, Radu. Energy-Efficient CO2 Capture from Flue Gas by Absorption with Amino Acids and Crystallization with a Bis-Iminoguanidine. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.iecr.9b00954.
Garrabrant, Kathleen A., Williams, Neil J., Holguin, Erick, Brethome, Flavien M., Tsouris, Costas, & Custelcean, Radu. Energy-Efficient CO2 Capture from Flue Gas by Absorption with Amino Acids and Crystallization with a Bis-Iminoguanidine. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.iecr.9b00954.
Garrabrant, Kathleen A., Williams, Neil J., Holguin, Erick, Brethome, Flavien M., Tsouris, Costas, and Custelcean, Radu. Fri . "Energy-Efficient CO2 Capture from Flue Gas by Absorption with Amino Acids and Crystallization with a Bis-Iminoguanidine". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.iecr.9b00954.
@article{osti_1528715,
title = {Energy-Efficient CO2 Capture from Flue Gas by Absorption with Amino Acids and Crystallization with a Bis-Iminoguanidine},
author = {Garrabrant, Kathleen A. and Williams, Neil J. and Holguin, Erick and Brethome, Flavien M. and Tsouris, Costas and Custelcean, Radu},
abstractNote = {In this work, we report a hybrid solvent/solid-state approach to CO2 separation from flue gas, consisting of absorption with aqueous glycine or sarcosine amino acids, followed by crystallization of the bicarbonate salt of glyoxal-bis(iminoguanidine) (GBIG), and subsequent solid-state CO2 release from the bicarbonate crystals. In this process, the GBIG bicarbonate crystallization regenerates the amino acid sorbent at ambient temperature, and the CO2 is subsequently released by mild heating (120 °C) of the GBIG bicarbonate crystals, which results in quantitative regeneration of GBIG. The cyclic capacities measured from multiple absorption–regeneration cycles are in the range of 0.2–0.3 mol CO2/mol amino acid. The regeneration energy of this hybrid solvent/solid-state approach is 24% and 40% lower than the regeneration energy of benchmark industrial sorbents monoethanolamine and sodium glycinate, respectively. Lastly, as the amino acid sorbent is never heated in the hybrid process, its loss through evaporation or degradation is minimized.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.iecr.9b00954},
journal = {Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research},
issn = {0888-5885},
number = 24,
volume = 58,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {5}
}