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Title: Isotope Enrichment Using Microchannel Distillation Technology

Abstract

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has successfully demonstrated isotopic enrichment with microchannel distillation (MCD) technology, a capability for process intensification of chemical boiling point separations (CBPS). Sixty separation stages were achieved in a single device, a new record for process intensification technologies. The minimum length of a separation stage was 0.41 cm, a factor of 5 smaller than the best commercial advanced structured packing. The reduced separation stage length dramatically shortens the column length, which is particularly important for isotopic enrichment that typically requires thousands of stages. A key advantage of MCD technology is scalability, which was demonstrated by increasing the length of the test device by a factor of 2.5 and doubling the number of channels while improving performance. Results were obtained for two separations, propane from propylene and isotopic enrichment of methane, which along with previous results with other separations, demonstrates the versatility and utility of MCD for difficult separations. By employing capillary forces, MCD devices can operated in a horizontal configuration that facilitates a lower equipment profile and compact systems. Compact systems are easier and cheaper to insulate and operate at cryogenic temperatures that are typical for isotopic enrichment. MCD devices have been operated as low asmore » the normal boiling point of methane, -182°C, and as high as the boiling point of diesel fuel, ~300°C.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]
  1. BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1526733
Report Number(s):
PNNL-28208
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Distillation, isotopic enrichment, microchannel, microchannel, process intensification, process intensification

Citation Formats

Bottenus, Daniel R., TeGrotenhuis, Ward E., Humble, Paul H., Hoppe, Eric W., and Powell, Michael R. Isotope Enrichment Using Microchannel Distillation Technology. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.2172/1526733.
Bottenus, Daniel R., TeGrotenhuis, Ward E., Humble, Paul H., Hoppe, Eric W., & Powell, Michael R. Isotope Enrichment Using Microchannel Distillation Technology. United States. doi:10.2172/1526733.
Bottenus, Daniel R., TeGrotenhuis, Ward E., Humble, Paul H., Hoppe, Eric W., and Powell, Michael R. Wed . "Isotope Enrichment Using Microchannel Distillation Technology". United States. doi:10.2172/1526733. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1526733.
@article{osti_1526733,
title = {Isotope Enrichment Using Microchannel Distillation Technology},
author = {Bottenus, Daniel R. and TeGrotenhuis, Ward E. and Humble, Paul H. and Hoppe, Eric W. and Powell, Michael R.},
abstractNote = {The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has successfully demonstrated isotopic enrichment with microchannel distillation (MCD) technology, a capability for process intensification of chemical boiling point separations (CBPS). Sixty separation stages were achieved in a single device, a new record for process intensification technologies. The minimum length of a separation stage was 0.41 cm, a factor of 5 smaller than the best commercial advanced structured packing. The reduced separation stage length dramatically shortens the column length, which is particularly important for isotopic enrichment that typically requires thousands of stages. A key advantage of MCD technology is scalability, which was demonstrated by increasing the length of the test device by a factor of 2.5 and doubling the number of channels while improving performance. Results were obtained for two separations, propane from propylene and isotopic enrichment of methane, which along with previous results with other separations, demonstrates the versatility and utility of MCD for difficult separations. By employing capillary forces, MCD devices can operated in a horizontal configuration that facilitates a lower equipment profile and compact systems. Compact systems are easier and cheaper to insulate and operate at cryogenic temperatures that are typical for isotopic enrichment. MCD devices have been operated as low as the normal boiling point of methane, -182°C, and as high as the boiling point of diesel fuel, ~300°C.},
doi = {10.2172/1526733},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {11}
}