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Title: Chemical Imaging of Atmospheric Organic Particles in the Eastern North Atlantic Field Campaign Report

Abstract

The ability to reliably predict future climate is hindered, in major part, by an insufficient understanding of atmospheric aerosol-radiation interactions and aerosol-cloud interactions. (IPCC 2013; Bony and Dufresne 2005) Factors affecting marine stratocumulus clouds are particularly important given that they are the dominant cloud type globally. Global climate models frequently misrepresent ubiquitous marine stratocumulus clouds for a variety of reasons, including a lack of understanding of how these cloud properties change with aerosol cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and composition.(Nam et al. 2012) Limited information is available regarding the sources of CCN in remote regions where marine stratocumulus clouds dominate. Measurements in these marine locations, which are periodically influenced by anthropogenic emissions, provide additional opportunity to study the impact of humans on cloud characteristics. The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) user facility Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) observatory on Graciosa Island in the Azores is well suited to study these problems. The ENA site is exposed to a multitude of air masses as well as a variety of cloud regimes, as documented by passive and active satellite cloud retrieval. (Tselioudis et al. 2013) Thus, placing detailed aerosol and cloud measurements at the ARM ENA site may help gainmore » a better understanding of the CCN budget and cloud interactions in remote environments. To provide detailed information on aerosol morphology, composition, and microphysical properties, size- segregated sampling was carried out at the ENA observatory on Graciosa Island during two intensive operating periods (IOPs). IOP1 occurred from June 17 to July 18, 2017, and IOP2 occurred from January 9 to February 21, 2018. Daytime and nighttime sampling were carried out separately to investigate any diurnal differences of aerosol composition due to differing meteorology. For both IOPs, a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) was used to collect particles for microscopic and microphysical analysis. A variety of microscopic substrates (formvar coated copper grids, silicon chips, silicon nitride windows, or molybdenum substrates) were used. Microscopic chemical characterization was carried out using computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM-EDX) and the synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS). (Laskin et al. 2006; Kilcoyne et al. 2003; Moffet et al. 2010) Two light sources were used for this analysis: 1) the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and 2) The Canadian Light Source.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Sonoma Technology, Inc.
  2. Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)
  3. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)
  4. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
  5. State University of New York, Stony Brook
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOE Office of Science Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Contributing Org.:
Purdue University, Sonoma Technology, Inc., Stony Brook University, Washington University in St Louis
OSTI Identifier:
1525989
Report Number(s):
DOE/SC-ARM-19-013
DOE Contract Number:  
ACO5-7601830
Resource Type:
Program Document
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Eastern North Atlantic, ACE-ENA field campaign, Graciosa Island, aerosols, clouds, Gulfstream-1 aircraft

Citation Formats

Moffet, Ryan C, Wang, Jian, Laskin, Alexander, Gilles, Mary K, and Knopf, Daniel. Chemical Imaging of Atmospheric Organic Particles in the Eastern North Atlantic Field Campaign Report. United States: N. p., 2019. Web.
Moffet, Ryan C, Wang, Jian, Laskin, Alexander, Gilles, Mary K, & Knopf, Daniel. Chemical Imaging of Atmospheric Organic Particles in the Eastern North Atlantic Field Campaign Report. United States.
Moffet, Ryan C, Wang, Jian, Laskin, Alexander, Gilles, Mary K, and Knopf, Daniel. Thu . "Chemical Imaging of Atmospheric Organic Particles in the Eastern North Atlantic Field Campaign Report". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1525989.
@article{osti_1525989,
title = {Chemical Imaging of Atmospheric Organic Particles in the Eastern North Atlantic Field Campaign Report},
author = {Moffet, Ryan C and Wang, Jian and Laskin, Alexander and Gilles, Mary K and Knopf, Daniel},
abstractNote = {The ability to reliably predict future climate is hindered, in major part, by an insufficient understanding of atmospheric aerosol-radiation interactions and aerosol-cloud interactions. (IPCC 2013; Bony and Dufresne 2005) Factors affecting marine stratocumulus clouds are particularly important given that they are the dominant cloud type globally. Global climate models frequently misrepresent ubiquitous marine stratocumulus clouds for a variety of reasons, including a lack of understanding of how these cloud properties change with aerosol cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and composition.(Nam et al. 2012) Limited information is available regarding the sources of CCN in remote regions where marine stratocumulus clouds dominate. Measurements in these marine locations, which are periodically influenced by anthropogenic emissions, provide additional opportunity to study the impact of humans on cloud characteristics. The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) user facility Eastern North Atlantic (ENA) observatory on Graciosa Island in the Azores is well suited to study these problems. The ENA site is exposed to a multitude of air masses as well as a variety of cloud regimes, as documented by passive and active satellite cloud retrieval. (Tselioudis et al. 2013) Thus, placing detailed aerosol and cloud measurements at the ARM ENA site may help gain a better understanding of the CCN budget and cloud interactions in remote environments. To provide detailed information on aerosol morphology, composition, and microphysical properties, size- segregated sampling was carried out at the ENA observatory on Graciosa Island during two intensive operating periods (IOPs). IOP1 occurred from June 17 to July 18, 2017, and IOP2 occurred from January 9 to February 21, 2018. Daytime and nighttime sampling were carried out separately to investigate any diurnal differences of aerosol composition due to differing meteorology. For both IOPs, a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) was used to collect particles for microscopic and microphysical analysis. A variety of microscopic substrates (formvar coated copper grids, silicon chips, silicon nitride windows, or molybdenum substrates) were used. Microscopic chemical characterization was carried out using computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM-EDX) and the synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS). (Laskin et al. 2006; Kilcoyne et al. 2003; Moffet et al. 2010) Two light sources were used for this analysis: 1) the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and 2) The Canadian Light Source.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {6}
}

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