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Title: Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program — A Summary of Collaborative Research and Development Activities

Abstract

This report describes the collaborative research and development projects in which the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is engaged with industry, regulatory agencies, and other organizations to achieve outcomes that are directed at sustaining the U.S. nuclear power industryduring Fiscal Year 2018. One way that this Program accomplishes its objectives—to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, enhance the economic performance, and extend the life of current reactors—is by conducting research together with industry and key organizations through cooperative arrangements and plans, through coordinated planning and management of resources and activities, through periodic technical exchanges of data and information, or by other means of interaction (i.e., contracts, memoranda of understanding, non-disclosure agreements, etc.). Broadly, these interactions represent different types of collaborations—formal or informal agreements between two or more organizations to work on something together that may be for a short or extended duration and may involve a single purpose or broad set of goals. DOE’s research, development, and demonstration role focuses on enhancing the safe, efficient, and economical performance of the nation’s nuclear fleet while studying and mitigating aging phenomena and issues that are applicable to the service environmentsmore » of operating reactors and require unique DOE laboratory expertise. Often, research and development (R&D) and demonstration activities are cost-shared, coordinated, or otherwise jointly conducted with industry, regulatory agencies, or other organizations through the aforementioned or other collaborative mechanisms. Operation of the existing fleet of plants to 60 years, extending the operating lifetimes of those plants beyond 60 years and, where practical, making further improvements in their productivity are essential to support the nation’s energy needs. Recently, several utilities have submitted or announced plans to submit applications to the U.S. NRC to begin the subsequent license-renewal process, extending the operating license period beyond 60 years from the date of their initial licensing. This marks an important planned milestone in the history of commercial nuclear power operations in the U.S.—one that underscores the long-term dependability of these plant designs and the commitment to their long-term performance by the organizations that operate them. The LWRS Program will continue to work with owner-operators to address the key issues needed to support the technical bases for continued safe long-term operation of our nation’s nuclear power assets.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Idaho National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1515005
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-19-52416-Rev000
DOE Contract Number:  
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Program Document
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 - ENGINEERING; Light Water Reactor Sustainability; Accident Tolerant Fuel; Advanced Test Reactor; guided-wave monitoring

Citation Formats

Hallbert, Bruce P. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program — A Summary of Collaborative Research and Development Activities. United States: N. p., 2019. Web.
Hallbert, Bruce P. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program — A Summary of Collaborative Research and Development Activities. United States.
Hallbert, Bruce P. Mon . "Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program — A Summary of Collaborative Research and Development Activities". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1515005.
@article{osti_1515005,
title = {Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program — A Summary of Collaborative Research and Development Activities},
author = {Hallbert, Bruce P},
abstractNote = {This report describes the collaborative research and development projects in which the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is engaged with industry, regulatory agencies, and other organizations to achieve outcomes that are directed at sustaining the U.S. nuclear power industryduring Fiscal Year 2018. One way that this Program accomplishes its objectives—to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, enhance the economic performance, and extend the life of current reactors—is by conducting research together with industry and key organizations through cooperative arrangements and plans, through coordinated planning and management of resources and activities, through periodic technical exchanges of data and information, or by other means of interaction (i.e., contracts, memoranda of understanding, non-disclosure agreements, etc.). Broadly, these interactions represent different types of collaborations—formal or informal agreements between two or more organizations to work on something together that may be for a short or extended duration and may involve a single purpose or broad set of goals. DOE’s research, development, and demonstration role focuses on enhancing the safe, efficient, and economical performance of the nation’s nuclear fleet while studying and mitigating aging phenomena and issues that are applicable to the service environments of operating reactors and require unique DOE laboratory expertise. Often, research and development (R&D) and demonstration activities are cost-shared, coordinated, or otherwise jointly conducted with industry, regulatory agencies, or other organizations through the aforementioned or other collaborative mechanisms. Operation of the existing fleet of plants to 60 years, extending the operating lifetimes of those plants beyond 60 years and, where practical, making further improvements in their productivity are essential to support the nation’s energy needs. Recently, several utilities have submitted or announced plans to submit applications to the U.S. NRC to begin the subsequent license-renewal process, extending the operating license period beyond 60 years from the date of their initial licensing. This marks an important planned milestone in the history of commercial nuclear power operations in the U.S.—one that underscores the long-term dependability of these plant designs and the commitment to their long-term performance by the organizations that operate them. The LWRS Program will continue to work with owner-operators to address the key issues needed to support the technical bases for continued safe long-term operation of our nation’s nuclear power assets.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {1}
}

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