skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Disturbed subsurface microbial communities follow equivalent trajectories despite different structural starting points: Microbial community succession and disturbance

Abstract

© 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Microbial community structure, and niche and neutral processes can all influence response to disturbance. Here, we provide experimental evidence for niche versus neutral and founding community effects during a bioremediation-related organic carbon disturbance. Subsurface sediment, partitioned into 22 flow-through columns, was stimulated in situ by the addition of acetate as a carbon and electron donor source. This drove the system into a new transient biogeochemical state characterized by iron reduction and enriched Desulfuromonadales, Comamonadaceae and Bacteroidetes lineages. After approximately 1 month conditions favoured sulfate reduction, and were accompanied by a substantial increase in the relative abundance of Desulfobulbus, Desulfosporosinus, Desulfitobacterium and Desulfotomaculum. Two subsets of four to five columns each were switched from acetate to lactate amendment during either iron (earlier) or sulfate (later) reduction. Hence, subsets had significantly different founding communities. All lactate treatments exhibited lower relative abundances of Desulfotomaculum and Bacteroidetes, enrichments of Clostridiales and Psychrosinus species, and a temporal succession from highly abundant Clostridium sensu stricto to Psychrosinus. Regardless of starting point, lactate-switch communities followed comparable structural trajectories, whereby convergence was evident 9 to 16 days after each switch, and significant after 29 to 34more » days of lactate addition. Results imply that neither the founding community nor neutral processes influenced succession following perturbation.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [2];  [5];  [6];  [5];  [2]
  1. Earth & Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley CA 94720 USA; Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA
  2. Earth & Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley CA 94720 USA
  3. Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PNNL, Richland WA USA
  4. Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California, Berkeley CA 94720 USA
  5. Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, LBNL, Berkeley CA USA
  6. Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont IL USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1512151
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1462-2912
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Handley, Kim M., Wrighton, Kelly C., Miller, Christopher S., Wilkins, Michael J., Kantor, Rose S., Thomas, Brian C., Williams, Kenneth H., Gilbert, Jack A., Long, Philip E., and Banfield, Jillian F. Disturbed subsurface microbial communities follow equivalent trajectories despite different structural starting points: Microbial community succession and disturbance. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1111/1462-2920.12467.
Handley, Kim M., Wrighton, Kelly C., Miller, Christopher S., Wilkins, Michael J., Kantor, Rose S., Thomas, Brian C., Williams, Kenneth H., Gilbert, Jack A., Long, Philip E., & Banfield, Jillian F. Disturbed subsurface microbial communities follow equivalent trajectories despite different structural starting points: Microbial community succession and disturbance. United States. doi:10.1111/1462-2920.12467.
Handley, Kim M., Wrighton, Kelly C., Miller, Christopher S., Wilkins, Michael J., Kantor, Rose S., Thomas, Brian C., Williams, Kenneth H., Gilbert, Jack A., Long, Philip E., and Banfield, Jillian F. Fri . "Disturbed subsurface microbial communities follow equivalent trajectories despite different structural starting points: Microbial community succession and disturbance". United States. doi:10.1111/1462-2920.12467.
@article{osti_1512151,
title = {Disturbed subsurface microbial communities follow equivalent trajectories despite different structural starting points: Microbial community succession and disturbance},
author = {Handley, Kim M. and Wrighton, Kelly C. and Miller, Christopher S. and Wilkins, Michael J. and Kantor, Rose S. and Thomas, Brian C. and Williams, Kenneth H. and Gilbert, Jack A. and Long, Philip E. and Banfield, Jillian F.},
abstractNote = {© 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Microbial community structure, and niche and neutral processes can all influence response to disturbance. Here, we provide experimental evidence for niche versus neutral and founding community effects during a bioremediation-related organic carbon disturbance. Subsurface sediment, partitioned into 22 flow-through columns, was stimulated in situ by the addition of acetate as a carbon and electron donor source. This drove the system into a new transient biogeochemical state characterized by iron reduction and enriched Desulfuromonadales, Comamonadaceae and Bacteroidetes lineages. After approximately 1 month conditions favoured sulfate reduction, and were accompanied by a substantial increase in the relative abundance of Desulfobulbus, Desulfosporosinus, Desulfitobacterium and Desulfotomaculum. Two subsets of four to five columns each were switched from acetate to lactate amendment during either iron (earlier) or sulfate (later) reduction. Hence, subsets had significantly different founding communities. All lactate treatments exhibited lower relative abundances of Desulfotomaculum and Bacteroidetes, enrichments of Clostridiales and Psychrosinus species, and a temporal succession from highly abundant Clostridium sensu stricto to Psychrosinus. Regardless of starting point, lactate-switch communities followed comparable structural trajectories, whereby convergence was evident 9 to 16 days after each switch, and significant after 29 to 34 days of lactate addition. Results imply that neither the founding community nor neutral processes influenced succession following perturbation.},
doi = {10.1111/1462-2920.12467},
journal = {Environmental Microbiology},
issn = {1462-2912},
number = 3,
volume = 17,
place = {United States},
year = {2014},
month = {4}
}

Works referenced in this record:

Basic local alignment search tool
journal, October 1990

  • Altschul, Stephen F.; Gish, Warren; Miller, Webb
  • Journal of Molecular Biology, Vol. 215, Issue 3, p. 403-410
  • DOI: 10.1016/S0022-2836(05)80360-2

Search and clustering orders of magnitude faster than BLAST
journal, August 2010