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Title: A high temperature instrument for consecutive measurements of thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient

Abstract

A device for measuring a plurality of material properties is designed to include accurate sensors configured to consecutively obtain thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient of a single sample while maintaining a vacuum or inert gas environment. Four major design factors are identified as sample-heat spreader mismatch, radiation losses, parasitic losses, and sample surface temperature variance. The design is analyzed using finite element methods for high temperature ranges up to 1000°C as well as ultra-high temperatures up to 2500°C. A temperature uncertainty of 0.46% was estimated for a sample with cold and hot sides at 905.1 and 908.5°C, respectively. The uncertainty at 1000°C was calculated to be 0.7% for a ?T of 5°C between the hot and cold sides. The thermal conductivity uncertainty was calculated to be -8.6% at ~900°C for a case with radiative gains, and +8.2% at ~1000°C for a case with radiative losses, indicating the sensitivity of the measurement to the temperature of the thermal guard in relation to the heat spreader and sample temperature. Lower limits of -17 and -13% error in thermal conductivity measurements were estimated at the ultra-high temperature of ~2500°C for a single-stage and double-stage radiation shield, respectively. Finally, it is notedmore » that this design is not limited to electro-thermal characterization and will enable measurement of ionic conductivity and surface temperatures of energy materials under realistic operating conditions in extreme temperature environments.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering
  2. Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1511608
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-18-27670
Journal ID: ISSN 0022-1481
Grant/Contract Number:  
89233218CNA000001; CAREER-1553987
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Heat Transfer
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Journal of Heat Transfer; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-1481
Publisher:
ASME
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Material Science; Conduction; Energy Systems; Experimental Techniques; Micro/nanoscale Heat Transfer; Thermophysical Properties

Citation Formats

Yazdani, Sajad, Kim, Hyun-Young, and Pettes, Michael T. A high temperature instrument for consecutive measurements of thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1115/1.4043572.
Yazdani, Sajad, Kim, Hyun-Young, & Pettes, Michael T. A high temperature instrument for consecutive measurements of thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient. United States. doi:10.1115/1.4043572.
Yazdani, Sajad, Kim, Hyun-Young, and Pettes, Michael T. Wed . "A high temperature instrument for consecutive measurements of thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient". United States. doi:10.1115/1.4043572.
@article{osti_1511608,
title = {A high temperature instrument for consecutive measurements of thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient},
author = {Yazdani, Sajad and Kim, Hyun-Young and Pettes, Michael T.},
abstractNote = {A device for measuring a plurality of material properties is designed to include accurate sensors configured to consecutively obtain thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient of a single sample while maintaining a vacuum or inert gas environment. Four major design factors are identified as sample-heat spreader mismatch, radiation losses, parasitic losses, and sample surface temperature variance. The design is analyzed using finite element methods for high temperature ranges up to 1000°C as well as ultra-high temperatures up to 2500°C. A temperature uncertainty of 0.46% was estimated for a sample with cold and hot sides at 905.1 and 908.5°C, respectively. The uncertainty at 1000°C was calculated to be 0.7% for a ?T of 5°C between the hot and cold sides. The thermal conductivity uncertainty was calculated to be -8.6% at ~900°C for a case with radiative gains, and +8.2% at ~1000°C for a case with radiative losses, indicating the sensitivity of the measurement to the temperature of the thermal guard in relation to the heat spreader and sample temperature. Lower limits of -17 and -13% error in thermal conductivity measurements were estimated at the ultra-high temperature of ~2500°C for a single-stage and double-stage radiation shield, respectively. Finally, it is noted that this design is not limited to electro-thermal characterization and will enable measurement of ionic conductivity and surface temperatures of energy materials under realistic operating conditions in extreme temperature environments.},
doi = {10.1115/1.4043572},
journal = {Journal of Heat Transfer},
issn = {0022-1481},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {4}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on April 24, 2020
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