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Title: The viscosity of atmospherically relevant organic particles

Abstract

The importance of organic aerosol particles in the environment has been long established, influencing cloud formation and lifetime, absorbing and scattering sunlight, affecting atmospheric composition and impacting on human health. Conventionally, ambient organic particles were considered to exist as liquids. Recent observations in field measurements and studies in the laboratory suggest that they may instead exist as highly viscous semi-solids or amorphous glassy solids under certain conditions, with important implications for atmospheric chemistry, climate and air quality. This review explores our understanding of aerosol particle phase, particularly as identified by measurements of the viscosity of organic particles, and the atmospheric implications of phase state.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]; ORCiD logo [6];  [7];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Bristol, Manchester (United Kingdom)
  2. Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)
  3. Univ. of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)
  4. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)
  5. Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)
  6. North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)
  7. Univ. of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1511471
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0012043
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Reid, Jonathan P., Bertram, Allan K., Topping, David O., Laskin, Alexander, Martin, Scot T., Petters, Markus D., Pope, Francis D., and Rovelli, Grazia. The viscosity of atmospherically relevant organic particles. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1038/s41467-018-03027-z.
Reid, Jonathan P., Bertram, Allan K., Topping, David O., Laskin, Alexander, Martin, Scot T., Petters, Markus D., Pope, Francis D., & Rovelli, Grazia. The viscosity of atmospherically relevant organic particles. United States. doi:10.1038/s41467-018-03027-z.
Reid, Jonathan P., Bertram, Allan K., Topping, David O., Laskin, Alexander, Martin, Scot T., Petters, Markus D., Pope, Francis D., and Rovelli, Grazia. Tue . "The viscosity of atmospherically relevant organic particles". United States. doi:10.1038/s41467-018-03027-z. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1511471.
@article{osti_1511471,
title = {The viscosity of atmospherically relevant organic particles},
author = {Reid, Jonathan P. and Bertram, Allan K. and Topping, David O. and Laskin, Alexander and Martin, Scot T. and Petters, Markus D. and Pope, Francis D. and Rovelli, Grazia},
abstractNote = {The importance of organic aerosol particles in the environment has been long established, influencing cloud formation and lifetime, absorbing and scattering sunlight, affecting atmospheric composition and impacting on human health. Conventionally, ambient organic particles were considered to exist as liquids. Recent observations in field measurements and studies in the laboratory suggest that they may instead exist as highly viscous semi-solids or amorphous glassy solids under certain conditions, with important implications for atmospheric chemistry, climate and air quality. This review explores our understanding of aerosol particle phase, particularly as identified by measurements of the viscosity of organic particles, and the atmospheric implications of phase state.},
doi = {10.1038/s41467-018-03027-z},
journal = {Nature Communications},
issn = {2041-1723},
number = 1,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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