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Title: Combined Sorbent/WGS-based CO2 Capture Process with Integrated Heat Management for IGCC Systems

Abstract

Southern Research has developed a combined CO2 capture water-gas shift (WGS) process for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) applications. A highly efficient regenerable magnesium based sorbent was prepared to remove CO2. It offers high and stable CO2 capacity with minimum requirement for temperature and pressure swings. Under optimized conditions, the sorbents achieved up to 8 mmol/g of CO2 working capacity and remained stable over 500 cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The selected WGS process achieved 96% CO per pass conversion and remained isothermal during the test duration that lasted over 500 cycles. The approach showed potential to reduce cost of electricity (COE) compared to the baseline carbon capture approaches. The process is for bench-scale and pilot development. In a commercial embodiment, syngas from the gasifier is cooled to warm gas conditions. It then enters the CO2 sorbent-shift reactor that uses an efficient MgO-based CO2 sorbent and a commercial catalyst to shift the CO to CO2 and capture 90% + of the carbon. Using a dual-bed arrangement, the sorbent is regenerated periodically by a combination of pressure and temperature swing to maintain steady state conditions and produce a 95+ % CO2 stream for sequestration. The hydrogen rich syngas is sent tomore » the IGCC for power production. In addition to consolidating CO2 capture with WGS, the proposed process reduces parasitic energy losses by operating at warm gas temperatures and reduces parasitic plant load (i.e., steam and auxiliary power) by reducing energy required for regeneration. The project consisted of 3 budget periods (BP) of laboratory-scale research and testing with go/no-go decisions after BP-1 and BP-2. In the 12 month BP-1, it was shown show that one promising sorbent maintained the required CO2 capacity and durability of >1.5 mmol/g over 100 cycles. Also based on sorbent and WGS experiments in separate reactors and combined reactor modeling, it was shown that the process had the potential to capture 90% of the CO2 at a lower than conventional amine-based approach. In the 18 month BP-2, a lab scale combined sorbent/WGS reactor system was built, commissioned, and tested with the promising sorbent from BP-1. 90% carbon capture was demonstrated over 100 cycles and it was shown that the process continued to have potential to capture 90% of the carbon at a cost that was less than the conventional amine-based approach. In the 6 month BP-3, a long term test was conducted using the best SR sorbent. The required durability of > 2 mmol/g was demonstrated after 500 cycles. Also, 90% carbon capture and 96% CO conversion was maintained over 1000 cycles. A technical and economic feasibility study was carried out to compare the proposed pre-combustion approach to a gasification plant employing a conventional pre-combustion approach and a conventional pulverized caol (PC) plant employing a conventional post combustion CO2 capture approach.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Southern Research Institute, Birmingham, AL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Southern Research Institute, Birmingham, AL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE), Clean Coal and Carbon Management
OSTI Identifier:
1510668
Report Number(s):
DOE-SRI-26388
DOE Contract Number:  
FE0026388
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 10 SYNTHETIC FUELS; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 08 HYDROGEN; coal gasification; water gas shift; pre-combustion CO2 capture; magnesium oxide sorbent

Citation Formats

Zhao, Shen, McCabe, Kevin, and Gangwal, Santosh. Combined Sorbent/WGS-based CO2 Capture Process with Integrated Heat Management for IGCC Systems. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1510668.
Zhao, Shen, McCabe, Kevin, & Gangwal, Santosh. Combined Sorbent/WGS-based CO2 Capture Process with Integrated Heat Management for IGCC Systems. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1510668
Zhao, Shen, McCabe, Kevin, and Gangwal, Santosh. 2019. "Combined Sorbent/WGS-based CO2 Capture Process with Integrated Heat Management for IGCC Systems". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1510668. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1510668.
@article{osti_1510668,
title = {Combined Sorbent/WGS-based CO2 Capture Process with Integrated Heat Management for IGCC Systems},
author = {Zhao, Shen and McCabe, Kevin and Gangwal, Santosh},
abstractNote = {Southern Research has developed a combined CO2 capture water-gas shift (WGS) process for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) applications. A highly efficient regenerable magnesium based sorbent was prepared to remove CO2. It offers high and stable CO2 capacity with minimum requirement for temperature and pressure swings. Under optimized conditions, the sorbents achieved up to 8 mmol/g of CO2 working capacity and remained stable over 500 cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The selected WGS process achieved 96% CO per pass conversion and remained isothermal during the test duration that lasted over 500 cycles. The approach showed potential to reduce cost of electricity (COE) compared to the baseline carbon capture approaches. The process is for bench-scale and pilot development. In a commercial embodiment, syngas from the gasifier is cooled to warm gas conditions. It then enters the CO2 sorbent-shift reactor that uses an efficient MgO-based CO2 sorbent and a commercial catalyst to shift the CO to CO2 and capture 90% + of the carbon. Using a dual-bed arrangement, the sorbent is regenerated periodically by a combination of pressure and temperature swing to maintain steady state conditions and produce a 95+ % CO2 stream for sequestration. The hydrogen rich syngas is sent to the IGCC for power production. In addition to consolidating CO2 capture with WGS, the proposed process reduces parasitic energy losses by operating at warm gas temperatures and reduces parasitic plant load (i.e., steam and auxiliary power) by reducing energy required for regeneration. The project consisted of 3 budget periods (BP) of laboratory-scale research and testing with go/no-go decisions after BP-1 and BP-2. In the 12 month BP-1, it was shown show that one promising sorbent maintained the required CO2 capacity and durability of >1.5 mmol/g over 100 cycles. Also based on sorbent and WGS experiments in separate reactors and combined reactor modeling, it was shown that the process had the potential to capture 90% of the CO2 at a lower than conventional amine-based approach. In the 18 month BP-2, a lab scale combined sorbent/WGS reactor system was built, commissioned, and tested with the promising sorbent from BP-1. 90% carbon capture was demonstrated over 100 cycles and it was shown that the process continued to have potential to capture 90% of the carbon at a cost that was less than the conventional amine-based approach. In the 6 month BP-3, a long term test was conducted using the best SR sorbent. The required durability of > 2 mmol/g was demonstrated after 500 cycles. Also, 90% carbon capture and 96% CO conversion was maintained over 1000 cycles. A technical and economic feasibility study was carried out to compare the proposed pre-combustion approach to a gasification plant employing a conventional pre-combustion approach and a conventional pulverized caol (PC) plant employing a conventional post combustion CO2 capture approach.},
doi = {10.2172/1510668},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1510668}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {4}
}