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Title: Silicone wristbands compared with traditional polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure assessment methods

Abstract

Currently there is a lack of inexpensive, easy-to-use technology to evaluate human exposure to environmental chemicals, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This is the first study in which silicone wristbands were deployed alongside other PAH exposure assessment methodologies. Wristbands were used within an established Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health birth cohort and compared to two traditional personal PAH exposure assessment methods: biological sampling with urine and active air monitoring with samplers (i.e. polyurethane foam (PUF) and filter) housed in backpacks. All samplers were deployed simultaneously on 22 pregnant women for 48-hours. Each woman provided one spot urine sample at the end of the 48-hour period. Sixty-two and 20 PAHs were quantified in the wristbands and PUF/filter, respectively; and eight hydroxy-PAH (OH-PAH) metabolites were quantified in the urine. PAHs in the PUF/filter and OH-PAHs correlate significantly for two of the eight comparisons (rs=0.53 and p=0.01; rs=0.44 and p=0.04). PAHs in the wristband and OH-PAHs correlate significantly for four of the eight comparisons; 1-OH-phenanthrene and 1-OH-pyrene strongly correlate with the parent PAHs in the wristband (rs=0.76 and p=<0.0001; rs=0.66 and p=0.0009). These results suggest wristbands are more closely associated with OH-PAHs in urine than active personal air monitoring methods.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1503522
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-123134
Journal ID: ISSN 1618-2642
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 410; Journal Issue: 13; Journal ID: ISSN 1618-2642
Publisher:
Springer
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Dixon, Holly M., Scott, Richard P., Holmes, Darrell, Calero, Lehyla, Kincl, Laurel D., Waters, Katrina M., Camann, David E., Calafat, Antonia M., Herbstman, Julie B., and Anderson, Kim A. Silicone wristbands compared with traditional polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure assessment methods. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1007/s00216-018-0992-z.
Dixon, Holly M., Scott, Richard P., Holmes, Darrell, Calero, Lehyla, Kincl, Laurel D., Waters, Katrina M., Camann, David E., Calafat, Antonia M., Herbstman, Julie B., & Anderson, Kim A. Silicone wristbands compared with traditional polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure assessment methods. United States. doi:10.1007/s00216-018-0992-z.
Dixon, Holly M., Scott, Richard P., Holmes, Darrell, Calero, Lehyla, Kincl, Laurel D., Waters, Katrina M., Camann, David E., Calafat, Antonia M., Herbstman, Julie B., and Anderson, Kim A. Mon . "Silicone wristbands compared with traditional polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure assessment methods". United States. doi:10.1007/s00216-018-0992-z.
@article{osti_1503522,
title = {Silicone wristbands compared with traditional polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure assessment methods},
author = {Dixon, Holly M. and Scott, Richard P. and Holmes, Darrell and Calero, Lehyla and Kincl, Laurel D. and Waters, Katrina M. and Camann, David E. and Calafat, Antonia M. and Herbstman, Julie B. and Anderson, Kim A.},
abstractNote = {Currently there is a lack of inexpensive, easy-to-use technology to evaluate human exposure to environmental chemicals, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This is the first study in which silicone wristbands were deployed alongside other PAH exposure assessment methodologies. Wristbands were used within an established Columbia Center for Children’s Environmental Health birth cohort and compared to two traditional personal PAH exposure assessment methods: biological sampling with urine and active air monitoring with samplers (i.e. polyurethane foam (PUF) and filter) housed in backpacks. All samplers were deployed simultaneously on 22 pregnant women for 48-hours. Each woman provided one spot urine sample at the end of the 48-hour period. Sixty-two and 20 PAHs were quantified in the wristbands and PUF/filter, respectively; and eight hydroxy-PAH (OH-PAH) metabolites were quantified in the urine. PAHs in the PUF/filter and OH-PAHs correlate significantly for two of the eight comparisons (rs=0.53 and p=0.01; rs=0.44 and p=0.04). PAHs in the wristband and OH-PAHs correlate significantly for four of the eight comparisons; 1-OH-phenanthrene and 1-OH-pyrene strongly correlate with the parent PAHs in the wristband (rs=0.76 and p=<0.0001; rs=0.66 and p=0.0009). These results suggest wristbands are more closely associated with OH-PAHs in urine than active personal air monitoring methods.},
doi = {10.1007/s00216-018-0992-z},
journal = {Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry},
issn = {1618-2642},
number = 13,
volume = 410,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}