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Title: Fracture Toughness Evaluation for Sandia Mock-up Stainless Steel Canister Weldment Using Spiral Notch Torsion Fracture Toughness Test

Abstract

Many radioactive materials within the nuclear fuel cycle present a significant hazard. Such materials include spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, legacy waste and other nuclear materials that have no current outlet than storage. These materials are often held in long-term storage as an interim stage within their lifecycle. Lifecycles can include reuse or disposal. Safety and security of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) interim storage installations are very important, due to a great concentration of fission products, actinides and activation products. Stress corrosion cracking of interim storage containers has been identified as a high priority data gap by the Department of Energy. However, little has been done with regards to the canister weld material properties, including the fracture toughness, and their impact on stress corrosion, until recently from Sandia National Laboratory canister mockup program. Furthermore, because no post-weld heat treatment was required, the associated high tensile residual stress within these canister welds can drive the initiation and growth of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) cracks. Thus, the fracture mechanical property, such as fracture toughness, is an essential information to understand the canister weldment fracture resistance behavior and to support mitigation protocol development to counter SCC. In this work, we carried out fracturemore » toughness evaluation on the received mock-up canister weldments from Sandia, using spiral notch torsion fracture test technology. The details of the weldment fracture toughness evaluation program development at ORNL are presented in this progress report. The objective of this research is to collect fracture toughness data on the mock-up canister weldment from Sandia National Laboratory. Data will be collected under quasi-static fracture loading using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT) technology carried out on a biaxial tension/torsion tester. These data will be used to support the ongoing SNF dry storage canister modeling activities and to address regulatory issues associated with canister container integrity and the follow-on SNF system transport reliability. SNTT has been a recent breakthrough in measuring fracture toughness for different materials, including metals, ceramics, concrete and polymers composites. Due to its high geometry constraint and unique loading condition, SNTT can be used to measure the fracture toughness with smaller specimens without concern of size effects. The application of SNTT to brittle materials has been proved to be successful. The micro-cracks induced by original notches in brittle materials could ensure crack growth in SNTT samples. Therefore, no fatigue pre-cracks are needed. The application of SNTT to the ductile material to generate valid toughness data will require a test sample with sufficient crack length to increase the sample fracture tip localized constraint. Fatigue pre-crack growth techniques are employed to introduce sharp crack front into the sample. Previously, only rough calculations were applied to estimate the compliance evolution in the SNTT crack growth process; while accurate quantitative descriptions have never been attempted. This generates an urgent need to understand the crack evolution during the SNTT fracture testing process of ductile materials. The newly developed governing equations for SNTT crack growth estimate are used to control the fatigue crack growth to effectively reaching the target crack length. The detailed SNTT approach and its estimated fracture toughness for the as-received Sandia canister weldment and the associated baseline 304 stainless steel are presented in this report. In the past SNTT technology has also been successfully applied to investigate the fracture behavior of X52 and X80 steels and the X52 welded materials used for hydrogen infrastructures. The current study in supporting Sandia SNF Dry Storage Mock-up Canister Program is the first attempt of applying SNTT to the highly ductile stainless steel and the associated weld materials. The SNTT test results indicate that SNTT method is a reliable test approach with good repeatability in applying to SS304 steel and SS304/308 weld material. The estimate JQ upon fracture for the baseline SS304 steel is at 1618 lb/in. The estimate JQ upon fracture for the SS304/308 weld from HAZ and weld specimens are 720 lb/in and 850 lb/in, respectively.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science & Technology Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1502533
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2019/1134
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Wang, Jy-An John. Fracture Toughness Evaluation for Sandia Mock-up Stainless Steel Canister Weldment Using Spiral Notch Torsion Fracture Toughness Test. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1502533.
Wang, Jy-An John. Fracture Toughness Evaluation for Sandia Mock-up Stainless Steel Canister Weldment Using Spiral Notch Torsion Fracture Toughness Test. United States. doi:10.2172/1502533.
Wang, Jy-An John. Fri . "Fracture Toughness Evaluation for Sandia Mock-up Stainless Steel Canister Weldment Using Spiral Notch Torsion Fracture Toughness Test". United States. doi:10.2172/1502533. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1502533.
@article{osti_1502533,
title = {Fracture Toughness Evaluation for Sandia Mock-up Stainless Steel Canister Weldment Using Spiral Notch Torsion Fracture Toughness Test},
author = {Wang, Jy-An John},
abstractNote = {Many radioactive materials within the nuclear fuel cycle present a significant hazard. Such materials include spent nuclear fuel, high-level waste, legacy waste and other nuclear materials that have no current outlet than storage. These materials are often held in long-term storage as an interim stage within their lifecycle. Lifecycles can include reuse or disposal. Safety and security of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) interim storage installations are very important, due to a great concentration of fission products, actinides and activation products. Stress corrosion cracking of interim storage containers has been identified as a high priority data gap by the Department of Energy. However, little has been done with regards to the canister weld material properties, including the fracture toughness, and their impact on stress corrosion, until recently from Sandia National Laboratory canister mockup program. Furthermore, because no post-weld heat treatment was required, the associated high tensile residual stress within these canister welds can drive the initiation and growth of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) cracks. Thus, the fracture mechanical property, such as fracture toughness, is an essential information to understand the canister weldment fracture resistance behavior and to support mitigation protocol development to counter SCC. In this work, we carried out fracture toughness evaluation on the received mock-up canister weldments from Sandia, using spiral notch torsion fracture test technology. The details of the weldment fracture toughness evaluation program development at ORNL are presented in this progress report. The objective of this research is to collect fracture toughness data on the mock-up canister weldment from Sandia National Laboratory. Data will be collected under quasi-static fracture loading using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT) technology carried out on a biaxial tension/torsion tester. These data will be used to support the ongoing SNF dry storage canister modeling activities and to address regulatory issues associated with canister container integrity and the follow-on SNF system transport reliability. SNTT has been a recent breakthrough in measuring fracture toughness for different materials, including metals, ceramics, concrete and polymers composites. Due to its high geometry constraint and unique loading condition, SNTT can be used to measure the fracture toughness with smaller specimens without concern of size effects. The application of SNTT to brittle materials has been proved to be successful. The micro-cracks induced by original notches in brittle materials could ensure crack growth in SNTT samples. Therefore, no fatigue pre-cracks are needed. The application of SNTT to the ductile material to generate valid toughness data will require a test sample with sufficient crack length to increase the sample fracture tip localized constraint. Fatigue pre-crack growth techniques are employed to introduce sharp crack front into the sample. Previously, only rough calculations were applied to estimate the compliance evolution in the SNTT crack growth process; while accurate quantitative descriptions have never been attempted. This generates an urgent need to understand the crack evolution during the SNTT fracture testing process of ductile materials. The newly developed governing equations for SNTT crack growth estimate are used to control the fatigue crack growth to effectively reaching the target crack length. The detailed SNTT approach and its estimated fracture toughness for the as-received Sandia canister weldment and the associated baseline 304 stainless steel are presented in this report. In the past SNTT technology has also been successfully applied to investigate the fracture behavior of X52 and X80 steels and the X52 welded materials used for hydrogen infrastructures. The current study in supporting Sandia SNF Dry Storage Mock-up Canister Program is the first attempt of applying SNTT to the highly ductile stainless steel and the associated weld materials. The SNTT test results indicate that SNTT method is a reliable test approach with good repeatability in applying to SS304 steel and SS304/308 weld material. The estimate JQ upon fracture for the baseline SS304 steel is at 1618 lb/in. The estimate JQ upon fracture for the SS304/308 weld from HAZ and weld specimens are 720 lb/in and 850 lb/in, respectively.},
doi = {10.2172/1502533},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {3}
}

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