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Title: Evaluation of chemical additives for glycolic destruction in the recycle collection tank

Abstract

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has completed a work scope in support of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Nitric-Glycolic flowsheet. Glycolic acid will replace formic acid as a reducing agent in the pre-processing of High-Level Waste sludge performed at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Glycolic acid will perform the same function as formic acid, namely reduction of mercury and adjustment of feed rheology and melter oxidation/reduction potential, while significantly reducing the potential for hydrogen generation in DWPF processing. Development testing has demonstrated glycolic acid virtually eliminates hydrogen production in the pre-processing steps. The Nitric-Glycolic flowsheet significantly improves DWPF’s ability to address Savannah River Site’s key challenge - the incorporation of effluent received from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). SWPF will deliver significant effluent volume to DWPF, resulting in a concurrent increase in DWPF effluent returned to the Concentration, Storage and Transfer Facilities (CSTF). This work scope demonstrates that glycolate can be destroyed under the Nitric-Glycolic flowsheet prior to returning the DWPF recycle stream to CSTF. To avoid potential flammability issues due to thermolysis of glycolate in CSTF, SRR tasked SRNL to quantify and mitigate glycolate returns via DWPF’s recycle stream. The development of a strategy for glycolic mitigationmore » was initiated with a system’s engineering workshop. Various chemical and/or physical solutions for how and where to destroy glycolate were considered – consistent with DWPF’s operational capabilities and process requirements. The workshop identified chemical oxidation of glycolate within the DWPF Recycle Collection Tank (RCT) a as the most promising option with sodium permanganate and Fenton’s reagent (metallic ion catalyzed hydrogen peroxide) as the two most promising oxidants.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1501828
Report Number(s):
SRNL-STI-2018-00585
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC09-08SR22470
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
DWPF; Recycle collection tank; glycolate destruction; oxidation

Citation Formats

Capogreco, H., Lambert, Dan P., Howe, Anthony M., Williams, Matt S., Trivelpiece, Cory L., and Ramsey, W. Gene. Evaluation of chemical additives for glycolic destruction in the recycle collection tank. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1501828.
Capogreco, H., Lambert, Dan P., Howe, Anthony M., Williams, Matt S., Trivelpiece, Cory L., & Ramsey, W. Gene. Evaluation of chemical additives for glycolic destruction in the recycle collection tank. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1501828
Capogreco, H., Lambert, Dan P., Howe, Anthony M., Williams, Matt S., Trivelpiece, Cory L., and Ramsey, W. Gene. Fri . "Evaluation of chemical additives for glycolic destruction in the recycle collection tank". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1501828. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1501828.
@article{osti_1501828,
title = {Evaluation of chemical additives for glycolic destruction in the recycle collection tank},
author = {Capogreco, H. and Lambert, Dan P. and Howe, Anthony M. and Williams, Matt S. and Trivelpiece, Cory L. and Ramsey, W. Gene},
abstractNote = {Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has completed a work scope in support of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Nitric-Glycolic flowsheet. Glycolic acid will replace formic acid as a reducing agent in the pre-processing of High-Level Waste sludge performed at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Glycolic acid will perform the same function as formic acid, namely reduction of mercury and adjustment of feed rheology and melter oxidation/reduction potential, while significantly reducing the potential for hydrogen generation in DWPF processing. Development testing has demonstrated glycolic acid virtually eliminates hydrogen production in the pre-processing steps. The Nitric-Glycolic flowsheet significantly improves DWPF’s ability to address Savannah River Site’s key challenge - the incorporation of effluent received from the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). SWPF will deliver significant effluent volume to DWPF, resulting in a concurrent increase in DWPF effluent returned to the Concentration, Storage and Transfer Facilities (CSTF). This work scope demonstrates that glycolate can be destroyed under the Nitric-Glycolic flowsheet prior to returning the DWPF recycle stream to CSTF. To avoid potential flammability issues due to thermolysis of glycolate in CSTF, SRR tasked SRNL to quantify and mitigate glycolate returns via DWPF’s recycle stream. The development of a strategy for glycolic mitigation was initiated with a system’s engineering workshop. Various chemical and/or physical solutions for how and where to destroy glycolate were considered – consistent with DWPF’s operational capabilities and process requirements. The workshop identified chemical oxidation of glycolate within the DWPF Recycle Collection Tank (RCT)a as the most promising option with sodium permanganate and Fenton’s reagent (metallic ion catalyzed hydrogen peroxide) as the two most promising oxidants.},
doi = {10.2172/1501828},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1501828}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {3}
}