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Title: Quantitative Proteome Analysis of Human Plasma Following in vivo Lipopolysaccharide Administration using O-16/O-18 Labeling and the Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

Abstract

Identification of novel diagnostic or therapeutic biomarkers from human blood plasma would benefit significantly from quantitative measurements of the proteome constituents over a range of physiological conditions. We describe here an initial demonstration of proteome-wide quantitative analysis of human plasma. The approach utilizes post-digestion trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O labeling, two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC)-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance ((FTICR) mass spectrometry, and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy for identification and quantification of peptides/proteins from complex samples. A peptide mass and time tag database was initially generated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) following extensive multidimensional LC separations and the database serves as a ‘look-up’ table for peptide identification. The mass and time tag database contains >8,000 putative identified peptides, which yielded 938 confident plasma protein identifications. The quantitative approach was applied to the comparative analyses of plasma samples from an individual prior to and 9 hours after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration without depletion of high abundant proteins. Accurate quantification of changes in protein abundance was demonstrated with both 1:1 labeling of control plasma and the comparison between the plasma samples following LPS administration. A total of 429 distinct plasma proteins were quantified from the comparative analyses and the protein abundances for 28more » proteins were observed to be significantly changed following LPS administration, including several known inflammatory response mediators.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
15016740
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-44302
12695; 400412000; TRN: US200515%%1116
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Molecular & Cellular Proteomics. MCP, 4(5):700-709
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ABUNDANCE; BLOOD PLASMA; CHROMATOGRAPHY; IN VIVO; ION CYCLOTRON-RESONANCE; LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; PEPTIDES; PLASMA; PROTEINS; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Qian, Weijun, Monroe, Matthew E, Liu, Tao, Jacobs, Jon M, Anderson, Gordon A, Shen, Yufeng, Moore, Ronald J, Anderson, David J, Zhang, Rui, Calvano, Steven E, Lowry, Stephen F, Xiao, Wenzhong, Moldawer, Lyle L, Davis, Ronald W, Tompkins, Ronald G, Camp, David G, and Smith, Richard D. Quantitative Proteome Analysis of Human Plasma Following in vivo Lipopolysaccharide Administration using O-16/O-18 Labeling and the Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1074/mcp.M500045-MCP200.
Qian, Weijun, Monroe, Matthew E, Liu, Tao, Jacobs, Jon M, Anderson, Gordon A, Shen, Yufeng, Moore, Ronald J, Anderson, David J, Zhang, Rui, Calvano, Steven E, Lowry, Stephen F, Xiao, Wenzhong, Moldawer, Lyle L, Davis, Ronald W, Tompkins, Ronald G, Camp, David G, & Smith, Richard D. Quantitative Proteome Analysis of Human Plasma Following in vivo Lipopolysaccharide Administration using O-16/O-18 Labeling and the Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach. United States. doi:10.1074/mcp.M500045-MCP200.
Qian, Weijun, Monroe, Matthew E, Liu, Tao, Jacobs, Jon M, Anderson, Gordon A, Shen, Yufeng, Moore, Ronald J, Anderson, David J, Zhang, Rui, Calvano, Steven E, Lowry, Stephen F, Xiao, Wenzhong, Moldawer, Lyle L, Davis, Ronald W, Tompkins, Ronald G, Camp, David G, and Smith, Richard D. Sun . "Quantitative Proteome Analysis of Human Plasma Following in vivo Lipopolysaccharide Administration using O-16/O-18 Labeling and the Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach". United States. doi:10.1074/mcp.M500045-MCP200.
@article{osti_15016740,
title = {Quantitative Proteome Analysis of Human Plasma Following in vivo Lipopolysaccharide Administration using O-16/O-18 Labeling and the Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach},
author = {Qian, Weijun and Monroe, Matthew E and Liu, Tao and Jacobs, Jon M and Anderson, Gordon A and Shen, Yufeng and Moore, Ronald J and Anderson, David J and Zhang, Rui and Calvano, Steven E and Lowry, Stephen F and Xiao, Wenzhong and Moldawer, Lyle L and Davis, Ronald W and Tompkins, Ronald G and Camp, David G and Smith, Richard D},
abstractNote = {Identification of novel diagnostic or therapeutic biomarkers from human blood plasma would benefit significantly from quantitative measurements of the proteome constituents over a range of physiological conditions. We describe here an initial demonstration of proteome-wide quantitative analysis of human plasma. The approach utilizes post-digestion trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O labeling, two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC)-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance ((FTICR) mass spectrometry, and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy for identification and quantification of peptides/proteins from complex samples. A peptide mass and time tag database was initially generated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) following extensive multidimensional LC separations and the database serves as a ‘look-up’ table for peptide identification. The mass and time tag database contains >8,000 putative identified peptides, which yielded 938 confident plasma protein identifications. The quantitative approach was applied to the comparative analyses of plasma samples from an individual prior to and 9 hours after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration without depletion of high abundant proteins. Accurate quantification of changes in protein abundance was demonstrated with both 1:1 labeling of control plasma and the comparison between the plasma samples following LPS administration. A total of 429 distinct plasma proteins were quantified from the comparative analyses and the protein abundances for 28 proteins were observed to be significantly changed following LPS administration, including several known inflammatory response mediators.},
doi = {10.1074/mcp.M500045-MCP200},
journal = {Molecular & Cellular Proteomics. MCP, 4(5):700-709},
number = 5,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {2005},
month = {5}
}