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Title: Analysis of Next Generation TCP

Abstract

The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) has been around for around 30 years, and in that time computer networks have increased in speed and reliability many times over. TCP has done very well to maintain stability and avoid collapse from congestion in the Internet with this incredible increase in speed. But as the speed of networks continues to increase, some assumptions about the underlying network that influenced the design of TCP may no longer hold valid. Additionally, modern networks often span many different types of links. For example, one end-to-end transmission may traverse both an optical link (high-bandwidth, low-loss) and a wireless network (low-bandwidth, high loss). TCP does not perform well in these situations. This survey will examine some of the reasons for this, focusing on high-bandwidth networks, and offer some solutions that have been proposed to fix these problems. This paper assumes basic knowledge of the TCP protocol.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
15014756
Report Number(s):
UCRL-TR-208615
TRN: US200802%%1418
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COMPUTER NETWORKS; DESIGN; FOCUSING; INTERNET; RELIABILITY; STABILITY

Citation Formats

Halliday, K, Hurst, A, and Nelson, J. Analysis of Next Generation TCP. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.2172/15014756.
Halliday, K, Hurst, A, & Nelson, J. Analysis of Next Generation TCP. United States. doi:10.2172/15014756.
Halliday, K, Hurst, A, and Nelson, J. Mon . "Analysis of Next Generation TCP". United States. doi:10.2172/15014756. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/15014756.
@article{osti_15014756,
title = {Analysis of Next Generation TCP},
author = {Halliday, K and Hurst, A and Nelson, J},
abstractNote = {The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) has been around for around 30 years, and in that time computer networks have increased in speed and reliability many times over. TCP has done very well to maintain stability and avoid collapse from congestion in the Internet with this incredible increase in speed. But as the speed of networks continues to increase, some assumptions about the underlying network that influenced the design of TCP may no longer hold valid. Additionally, modern networks often span many different types of links. For example, one end-to-end transmission may traverse both an optical link (high-bandwidth, low-loss) and a wireless network (low-bandwidth, high loss). TCP does not perform well in these situations. This survey will examine some of the reasons for this, focusing on high-bandwidth networks, and offer some solutions that have been proposed to fix these problems. This paper assumes basic knowledge of the TCP protocol.},
doi = {10.2172/15014756},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2004},
month = {12}
}

Technical Report:

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