skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Evaluation Of Microdosing Strategies For Studies In Preclinical Drug Development: Demonstration Of Linear Pharmacokinetics In Dogs Of A Nucleoside Analogue Over A 50-Fold Dose Range

Abstract

The technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was validated successfully and utilized to study the pharmacokinetics and disposition in dogs of a preclinical drug candidate (Compound A), after oral and intravenous administration. The primary objective of this study was to examine whether Compound A displayed linear kinetics across sub-pharmacological (microdose) and pharmacological dose ranges in an animal model, prior to initiation of a human microdose study. The AMS-derived disposition properties of Compound A were comparable to data obtained via conventional techniques such as LC-MS/MS and liquid scintillation counting analyses. Thus, Compound A displayed multiphasic kinetics and possessed low plasma clearance (4.4 mL/min/kg), a long terminal elimination half-life (19.4 hr) and high oral bioavailability (82%). Currently there are no published comparisons of the kinetics of a pharmaceutical compound at pharmacological versus sub-pharmacological doses employing microdosing strategies. The present study thus provides the first description of the pharmacokinetics of a drug candidate assessed under these two dosing regimens. The data demonstrated that the pharmacokinetic properties of Compound A were similar following dosing at 0.02 mg/kg as at 1 mg/kg, indicating that in the case of Compound A, the kinetics of absorption, distribution and elimination in the dog appear to be linear acrossmore » this 50-fold dose range. Moreover, the exceptional sensitivity of AMS provided a pharmacokinetic profile of Compound A, even following a microdose, which revealed aspects of the disposition of this agent that were inaccessible by conventional techniques. The applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) are broad ranging and vary from studying environmental and ecological issues such as the isotopic composition of the atmosphere, soil and water (Hughen et al., 2000; Beck et al., 2001; Keith-Roach et al., 2001; Mironov et al., 2002), to archaeology and volcanology (Stafford et al., 1984; Vogel et al., 1990; Smith et al., 1999) to its use as a bioanalytical tool for nutritional research (Buchholz et al., 1999; Deuker et al., 2000; Weaver and Liebman, 2002). Biomedical applications of AMS and its use in the arena of pharmaceutical research also have been detailed in review articles (Barker and Garner, 1999; Garner, 2000; Turteltaub and Vogel, 2000). To date, most studies on the metabolism and disposition of xenobiotics by AMS have focused on how carcinogens bind to DNA and proteins to form adducts (Turteltaub et al., 1990, 1997; Frantz et al., 1995; Dingley et al., 1999; Li et al., 2003). Its application to the field of pharmaceutical sciences has been limited to a few studies (Kaye et al., 1997; Young et al., 2001; Garner et al., 2002). However, the pharmaceutical industry is becoming increasingly aware of the potential benefits that may accrue from the ultra high sensitivity afforded by AMS in terms of evaluating the pharmacokinetics of lead drug candidates in early development. Specifically, AMS allows administration of sub-pharmacological doses (microdoses) of carbon-14 or tritium-labeled investigational drugs to animals or humans at radiologically insignificant levels with the goal of obtaining preliminary information regarding the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of test compounds (Turteltaub and Vogel, 2000). An unresolved issue, however, is whether the pharmacokinetics determined following a microdose are representative of those following a conventional (pharmacological) dose (Lappin and Garner, 2003). This paper examines the linearity of kinetics of an antiviral nucleoside analogue, Compound A, across sub-pharmacological and pharmacological dose ranges in the dog prior to initiation of a human microdose study. The specific objectives of this study, therefore, were (1) to assess the pharmacokinetics of Compound A in dogs by a conventional dosing approach utilizing LC-MS/MS for sample analysis, (2) to assess the pharmacokinetics of Compound A in dogs by the microdose approach utilizing AMS for sample analysis, (3) to compare the pharmacokinetics of Compound A at a microdose versus a pharmacological dose, and (4) to validate AMS for this application and to compare the sensitivity of AMS to that of LC-MS/MS.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
15014140
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JRNL-203830
Journal ID: ISSN 0090-9556; DMDSAI; TRN: US200805%%305
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Published in: Drug Metabolism and Disposition, vol. 32, no. 11, November 1, 2004, pp. 1254-9; Journal Volume: 32; Journal Issue: 11
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; BLOOD-PLASMA CLEARANCE; CARBON 14; DRUGS; EVALUATION; KINETICS; MASS SPECTROSCOPY; NUCLEOSIDES; SCINTILLATION COUNTING; SENSITIVITY

Citation Formats

Sandhu, P, Vogel, J S, Rose, M J, Ubick, E A, Brunner, J E, Wallace, M A, Adelsberger, J K, Baker, M P, Henderson, P T, Pearson, P G, and Baillie, T A. Evaluation Of Microdosing Strategies For Studies In Preclinical Drug Development: Demonstration Of Linear Pharmacokinetics In Dogs Of A Nucleoside Analogue Over A 50-Fold Dose Range. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.1124/dmd.104.000422.
Sandhu, P, Vogel, J S, Rose, M J, Ubick, E A, Brunner, J E, Wallace, M A, Adelsberger, J K, Baker, M P, Henderson, P T, Pearson, P G, & Baillie, T A. Evaluation Of Microdosing Strategies For Studies In Preclinical Drug Development: Demonstration Of Linear Pharmacokinetics In Dogs Of A Nucleoside Analogue Over A 50-Fold Dose Range. United States. doi:10.1124/dmd.104.000422.
Sandhu, P, Vogel, J S, Rose, M J, Ubick, E A, Brunner, J E, Wallace, M A, Adelsberger, J K, Baker, M P, Henderson, P T, Pearson, P G, and Baillie, T A. Thu . "Evaluation Of Microdosing Strategies For Studies In Preclinical Drug Development: Demonstration Of Linear Pharmacokinetics In Dogs Of A Nucleoside Analogue Over A 50-Fold Dose Range". United States. doi:10.1124/dmd.104.000422. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/15014140.
@article{osti_15014140,
title = {Evaluation Of Microdosing Strategies For Studies In Preclinical Drug Development: Demonstration Of Linear Pharmacokinetics In Dogs Of A Nucleoside Analogue Over A 50-Fold Dose Range},
author = {Sandhu, P and Vogel, J S and Rose, M J and Ubick, E A and Brunner, J E and Wallace, M A and Adelsberger, J K and Baker, M P and Henderson, P T and Pearson, P G and Baillie, T A},
abstractNote = {The technique of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was validated successfully and utilized to study the pharmacokinetics and disposition in dogs of a preclinical drug candidate (Compound A), after oral and intravenous administration. The primary objective of this study was to examine whether Compound A displayed linear kinetics across sub-pharmacological (microdose) and pharmacological dose ranges in an animal model, prior to initiation of a human microdose study. The AMS-derived disposition properties of Compound A were comparable to data obtained via conventional techniques such as LC-MS/MS and liquid scintillation counting analyses. Thus, Compound A displayed multiphasic kinetics and possessed low plasma clearance (4.4 mL/min/kg), a long terminal elimination half-life (19.4 hr) and high oral bioavailability (82%). Currently there are no published comparisons of the kinetics of a pharmaceutical compound at pharmacological versus sub-pharmacological doses employing microdosing strategies. The present study thus provides the first description of the pharmacokinetics of a drug candidate assessed under these two dosing regimens. The data demonstrated that the pharmacokinetic properties of Compound A were similar following dosing at 0.02 mg/kg as at 1 mg/kg, indicating that in the case of Compound A, the kinetics of absorption, distribution and elimination in the dog appear to be linear across this 50-fold dose range. Moreover, the exceptional sensitivity of AMS provided a pharmacokinetic profile of Compound A, even following a microdose, which revealed aspects of the disposition of this agent that were inaccessible by conventional techniques. The applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) are broad ranging and vary from studying environmental and ecological issues such as the isotopic composition of the atmosphere, soil and water (Hughen et al., 2000; Beck et al., 2001; Keith-Roach et al., 2001; Mironov et al., 2002), to archaeology and volcanology (Stafford et al., 1984; Vogel et al., 1990; Smith et al., 1999) to its use as a bioanalytical tool for nutritional research (Buchholz et al., 1999; Deuker et al., 2000; Weaver and Liebman, 2002). Biomedical applications of AMS and its use in the arena of pharmaceutical research also have been detailed in review articles (Barker and Garner, 1999; Garner, 2000; Turteltaub and Vogel, 2000). To date, most studies on the metabolism and disposition of xenobiotics by AMS have focused on how carcinogens bind to DNA and proteins to form adducts (Turteltaub et al., 1990, 1997; Frantz et al., 1995; Dingley et al., 1999; Li et al., 2003). Its application to the field of pharmaceutical sciences has been limited to a few studies (Kaye et al., 1997; Young et al., 2001; Garner et al., 2002). However, the pharmaceutical industry is becoming increasingly aware of the potential benefits that may accrue from the ultra high sensitivity afforded by AMS in terms of evaluating the pharmacokinetics of lead drug candidates in early development. Specifically, AMS allows administration of sub-pharmacological doses (microdoses) of carbon-14 or tritium-labeled investigational drugs to animals or humans at radiologically insignificant levels with the goal of obtaining preliminary information regarding the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of test compounds (Turteltaub and Vogel, 2000). An unresolved issue, however, is whether the pharmacokinetics determined following a microdose are representative of those following a conventional (pharmacological) dose (Lappin and Garner, 2003). This paper examines the linearity of kinetics of an antiviral nucleoside analogue, Compound A, across sub-pharmacological and pharmacological dose ranges in the dog prior to initiation of a human microdose study. The specific objectives of this study, therefore, were (1) to assess the pharmacokinetics of Compound A in dogs by a conventional dosing approach utilizing LC-MS/MS for sample analysis, (2) to assess the pharmacokinetics of Compound A in dogs by the microdose approach utilizing AMS for sample analysis, (3) to compare the pharmacokinetics of Compound A at a microdose versus a pharmacological dose, and (4) to validate AMS for this application and to compare the sensitivity of AMS to that of LC-MS/MS.},
doi = {10.1124/dmd.104.000422},
journal = {Published in: Drug Metabolism and Disposition, vol. 32, no. 11, November 1, 2004, pp. 1254-9},
number = 11,
volume = 32,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 22 00:00:00 EDT 2004},
month = {Thu Apr 22 00:00:00 EDT 2004}
}