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Title: Analysis of Geomechanical Behavior for the Drift Scale Test

Abstract

The Drift Scale Test (DST) now underway at Yucca Mountain has been simulated using a Drift Scale Distinct Element (DSDE) model. Simulated deformations show good agreement with field deformation measurements. Results indicate most fracture deformation is located above the crown of the Heated Drift. This work is part of the model validation effort for the DSDE model, which is used to assess thermal-mechanical effects on the hydrology of the rock mass surrounding a potential repository.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
15013151
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JC-141552-REV-1
TRN: US0601056
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 9th International High-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference, Las Vegas, NV, Apr 29 - May 03, 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; DEFORMATION; FRACTURES; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; HYDROLOGY; MANAGEMENT; VALIDATION; YUCCA MOUNTAIN

Citation Formats

Blair, S C, Carlson, S R, and Wagoner, J L. Analysis of Geomechanical Behavior for the Drift Scale Test. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
Blair, S C, Carlson, S R, & Wagoner, J L. Analysis of Geomechanical Behavior for the Drift Scale Test. United States.
Blair, S C, Carlson, S R, and Wagoner, J L. 2001. "Analysis of Geomechanical Behavior for the Drift Scale Test". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/15013151.
@article{osti_15013151,
title = {Analysis of Geomechanical Behavior for the Drift Scale Test},
author = {Blair, S C and Carlson, S R and Wagoner, J L},
abstractNote = {The Drift Scale Test (DST) now underway at Yucca Mountain has been simulated using a Drift Scale Distinct Element (DSDE) model. Simulated deformations show good agreement with field deformation measurements. Results indicate most fracture deformation is located above the crown of the Heated Drift. This work is part of the model validation effort for the DSDE model, which is used to assess thermal-mechanical effects on the hydrology of the rock mass surrounding a potential repository.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2001,
month = 3
}

Conference:
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  • The Drift Scale Test (DST) now underway at Yucca Mountain has been simulated using a Drift Scale Distinct Element (DSDE) model. Simulated deformations show good agreement with field deformation measurements. Results indicate most fracture deformation is located above the crown of the Heated Drift. This work is part of the model validation effort for the DSDE model, which is used to assess thermal-mechanical effects on the hydrology of the rock mass surrounding a potential repository.
  • The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is conducting a drift scale heater test, known as the Drift Scale Test (DST), in an alcove of the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The DST is a large-scale, long-term thermal test designed to investigate coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical behavior in a fractured, welded tuff rock mass. The general layout of the DST is shown in Figure 1a, along with the locations of several of the boreholes being used to monitor deformation during the test. Electric heaters are being used to heat a planar region of rock that is approximately 50 m long andmore » 27 m wide for 4 years, followed by 4 years of cooling. Both in-drift and ''wing'' heaters are being used to heat the rock. The heating portion of the DST was started in December, 1997, and the target drift wall temperature of 200 C was reached in summer 2000. A drift-scale distinct element model (DSDE) is being used to analyze the geomechanical response of the rock mass forming the DST. The distinct element method was chosen to permit explicit modeling of fracture deformations. Shear deformations and normal mode opening of fractures are expected to increase fracture permeability and thereby alter thermal-hydrologic behavior in the DST. This paper will describe the DSDE model and present preliminary results, including comparison of simulated and observed deformations, at selected locations within the test.« less
  • This paper presents results from a coupled thermal, hydrological and mechanical analysis of thermally-induced permeability changes during heating and cooling of fractured volcanic rock at the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The analysis extends the previous analysis of the four-year heating phase to include newly available data from the subsequent four year cooling phase. The new analysis of the cooling phase shows that the measured changes in fracture permeability follows that of a thermo-hydro-elastic model on average, but at several locations the measured permeability indicates (inelastic) irreversible behavior. At the end of the cooling phase, the air-permeability hadmore » decreased at some locations (to as low as 0.2 of initial), whereas it had increased at other locations (to as high as 1.8 of initial). Our analysis shows that such irreversible changes in fracture permeability are consistent with either inelastic fracture shear dilation (where permeability increased) or inelastic fracture surface asperity shortening (where permeability decreased). These data are important for bounding model predictions of potential thermally-induced changes in rock-mass permeability at a future repository at Yucca Mountain.« less
  • The Yucca Mountain Project is currently evaluating the coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical (TMHC) response of the potential repository host rock through an in situ thermal testing program. A drift scale test (DST) was constructed during 1997 and heaters were turned on in December 1997. The DST includes nine canister-sized containers with thirty operating heaters each located within the heated drift (HD) and fifty wing heaters located in boreholes in both ribs with a total power output of nominally 210kW. A total of 147 boreholes (combined length of 3.3 km) houses most of the over 3700 TMHC sensors connected with 201 km ofmore » cabling to a central data acquisition system. The DST is located in the Exploratory Studies Facility in a 5-m diameter drift approximately 50 m in length. Heating will last up to four years and cooling will last another four years. The rock mass surrounding the DST will experience a harsh thermal environment with rock surface temperatures expected to reach a maximum of about 200 C. This paper describes the process of designing the DST. The first 38 m of the 50-m long Heated Drift (HD) is dedicated to collection of data that will lead to a better understanding of the complex coupled TMHC processes in the host rock of the proposed repository. The final 12 m is dedicated to evaluating the interactions between the heated rock mass and cast-in-place (CIP) concrete ground support systems at elevated temperatures. In addition to a description of the DST design, data from site characterization, and a general description of the analyses and analysis approach used to design the test and make pretest predictions are presented. Test-scoping and pretest numerical predictions of one way thermal-hydrologic, thermal-mechanical, and thermal-chemical behaviors have been completed (TRW, 1997a). These analyses suggest that a dry-out zone will be created around the DST and a 10,000 m{sup 3} volume of rock will experience temperatures above 100 C. The HD will experience large stress increases, particularly in the crown of the drift. Thermoelastic displacements of up to about 16 mm are predicted for some thermomechanical gages. Additional analyses using more complex models will be performed during the conduct of the DST and the results compared with measured data.« less
  • No abstract prepared.