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Title: T-REX: Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-rays Moving X-Ray Science into the ''Nuclear'' Applications Space with Thompson Scattered Photons

Abstract

The scattering of laser photons from relativistic electrons (Thomson scattering) has been demonstrated to be a viable method for the production of ultrashort-duration pulses of tunable radiation in the 10-keV to 100-keV range. Photons in this range are capable of exciting or ionizing even the most tightly bound of atomic electrons. A wide variety of atomistic scale applications are possible. For example, Thomson x-ray sources have been constructed at LLNL (PLEIADES) and LBL as picosecond, stroboscopic probes of atomic-scale dynamics and at Vanderbilt University as element-specific tools for medical radiography and radiology. While these sources have demonstrated an attractive ability to simultaneously probe on an atomic spatial and temporal scale, they do not necessarily exploit the full potential of the Thomson scattering process to produce high-brightness, high-energy photons. In this white paper, we suggest that the peak brightness of Thomson sources can scale as fast as the 4th power of electron beam energy and that production via Thomson scattering of quasi-monochromatic, tunable radiation in the ''nuclear-range'' between 100-keV and several MeV is potentially a much more attractive application space for this process. Traditional sources in this regime are inherently ultra-broadband and decline rapidly in brightness as a function of photonmore » energy. The output from dedicated, national-laboratory-scale, synchrotron facilities, e.g. APS, SPring8, ESRF etc., declines by more than 10 orders from 100 keV to 1 MeV. At 1 MeV, we conservatively estimate that Thomson-source, peak brightness can exceed that of APS (the best machine in the DOE complex) by more than 15 orders of magnitude. In much the same way that tunable lasers revolutionized atomic spectroscopy, this ''Peta-step'' advance in tunable, narrow-bandwidth, capability should enable entirely new fields of study and new, programmatically-interesting, applications such as: micrometer-spatial-resolution, MeV, flash radiography of dense, energetic systems (NIF, JASPER), precision, photo-nuclear absorption spectroscopy (DNT, PAT), non-destructive, resonant nuclear fluorescent imaging of special nuclear materials (NAI, DHS), dynamic, micro-crack failure analysis (aerospace industry, SSP) etc. Concepts are presented for new Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-ray (T-REX) sources at LLNL. These leverage LLNL's world-leading expertise in high-intensity lasers, high average power lasers, diffractive optics, Thomson-based x-ray source development, and advanced photoguns to produce tunable, quasi-monochromatic radiation from 50-keV to several MeV. Above {approx}100 keV, T-REX would be unique in the world with respect to BOTH peak x-ray brilliance AND average x-ray brilliance. This capability would naturally compliment the x-ray capability of large-scale, synchrotron facilities currently within the DoE complex by significantly extending the x-ray energy range over which, tunable, high-brightness applications could be pursued. It would do so at a small fraction of the cost of the purely, accelerator-based facilities. It is anticipated that T-REX could provide new opportunities for interaction of LLNL with the DoE Office of Science, DARPA, DHS etc. and would place LLNL clearly at the forefront of laser-based, x-ray generation world-wide.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
15011627
Report Number(s):
UCRL-TR-206825
TRN: US0501344
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 21 Sep 2004
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; 42 ENGINEERING; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; BRIGHTNESS; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRONS; ENERGY RANGE; LASERS; OPTICS; PHOTONS; PROBES; RADIATIONS; RADIOLOGY; SCATTERING; SPECTROSCOPY; SYNCHROTRONS; THOMSON SCATTERING; X-RAY SOURCES

Citation Formats

Barty, C P, and Hartemann, F V. T-REX: Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-rays Moving X-Ray Science into the ''Nuclear'' Applications Space with Thompson Scattered Photons. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.2172/15011627.
Barty, C P, & Hartemann, F V. T-REX: Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-rays Moving X-Ray Science into the ''Nuclear'' Applications Space with Thompson Scattered Photons. United States. doi:10.2172/15011627.
Barty, C P, and Hartemann, F V. Tue . "T-REX: Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-rays Moving X-Ray Science into the ''Nuclear'' Applications Space with Thompson Scattered Photons". United States. doi:10.2172/15011627. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/15011627.
@article{osti_15011627,
title = {T-REX: Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-rays Moving X-Ray Science into the ''Nuclear'' Applications Space with Thompson Scattered Photons},
author = {Barty, C P and Hartemann, F V},
abstractNote = {The scattering of laser photons from relativistic electrons (Thomson scattering) has been demonstrated to be a viable method for the production of ultrashort-duration pulses of tunable radiation in the 10-keV to 100-keV range. Photons in this range are capable of exciting or ionizing even the most tightly bound of atomic electrons. A wide variety of atomistic scale applications are possible. For example, Thomson x-ray sources have been constructed at LLNL (PLEIADES) and LBL as picosecond, stroboscopic probes of atomic-scale dynamics and at Vanderbilt University as element-specific tools for medical radiography and radiology. While these sources have demonstrated an attractive ability to simultaneously probe on an atomic spatial and temporal scale, they do not necessarily exploit the full potential of the Thomson scattering process to produce high-brightness, high-energy photons. In this white paper, we suggest that the peak brightness of Thomson sources can scale as fast as the 4th power of electron beam energy and that production via Thomson scattering of quasi-monochromatic, tunable radiation in the ''nuclear-range'' between 100-keV and several MeV is potentially a much more attractive application space for this process. Traditional sources in this regime are inherently ultra-broadband and decline rapidly in brightness as a function of photon energy. The output from dedicated, national-laboratory-scale, synchrotron facilities, e.g. APS, SPring8, ESRF etc., declines by more than 10 orders from 100 keV to 1 MeV. At 1 MeV, we conservatively estimate that Thomson-source, peak brightness can exceed that of APS (the best machine in the DOE complex) by more than 15 orders of magnitude. In much the same way that tunable lasers revolutionized atomic spectroscopy, this ''Peta-step'' advance in tunable, narrow-bandwidth, capability should enable entirely new fields of study and new, programmatically-interesting, applications such as: micrometer-spatial-resolution, MeV, flash radiography of dense, energetic systems (NIF, JASPER), precision, photo-nuclear absorption spectroscopy (DNT, PAT), non-destructive, resonant nuclear fluorescent imaging of special nuclear materials (NAI, DHS), dynamic, micro-crack failure analysis (aerospace industry, SSP) etc. Concepts are presented for new Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-ray (T-REX) sources at LLNL. These leverage LLNL's world-leading expertise in high-intensity lasers, high average power lasers, diffractive optics, Thomson-based x-ray source development, and advanced photoguns to produce tunable, quasi-monochromatic radiation from 50-keV to several MeV. Above {approx}100 keV, T-REX would be unique in the world with respect to BOTH peak x-ray brilliance AND average x-ray brilliance. This capability would naturally compliment the x-ray capability of large-scale, synchrotron facilities currently within the DoE complex by significantly extending the x-ray energy range over which, tunable, high-brightness applications could be pursued. It would do so at a small fraction of the cost of the purely, accelerator-based facilities. It is anticipated that T-REX could provide new opportunities for interaction of LLNL with the DoE Office of Science, DARPA, DHS etc. and would place LLNL clearly at the forefront of laser-based, x-ray generation world-wide.},
doi = {10.2172/15011627},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2004},
month = {9}
}

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