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Title: ENVIROSUITE: USING STATE-OF-THE-ART SYNCHROTRON TECHNIQUES TO UNDERSTAND ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION SCIENCE ISSUES AT THE MOLECULAR LEVEL.

Abstract

Although DOE's Environmental Management program has made steady progress in cleaning up environmental legacies throughout the DOE complex, there are still significant remediation issues that remain to be solved. For example, DOE faces difficult challenges related to potential mobilization of radionuclides (e.g., actinides) and other hazardous contaminants in soils, removal and final treatment of high-level waste and residuals from leaking tanks, and the long-term stewardship of remediated sites and engineered disposal facilities, to name just a few. In some cases, new technologies and technology applications will be required based on current engineering expertise. In others, however, basic scientific research is needed to understand the mechanisms of how contaminants behave under specific conditions and how they interact with the environment, from which new engineering solutions can emerge. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Stony Brook University, scientists have teamed to use state-of-the-art synchrotron techniques to help understand the basic interactions of contaminants in the environment. Much of this work is conducted at the BNL National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), which is a user facility that provides high energy X-ray and ultraviolet photon beams to facilitate the examination of contaminants and materials at the molecular level. These studies allow us to determinemore » how chemical speciation and structure control important parameters such as solubility, which in turn drive critical performance characteristics such as leaching. In one study for example, we are examining the effects of microbial activity on actinide contaminants under conditions anticipated at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. One possible outcome of this research is the identification of specific microbes that can trap uranium or other contaminants within the intracellular structure and help mitigate mobility. In another study, we are exploring the interaction of contaminants with soil and plant roots to better understand the mechanisms responsible for uptake. This effort will lead to improvements in phytoremediation, an innovative and cost-effective approach to the cleanup of large volumes of soil with low concentrations of contaminants. In a third effort, we are investigating molecular interactions of contaminants in high-level waste tanks with potential grouting materials for remediation of the West Valley, NY site to assess their suitability and long-term performance.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE/BER (US)
OSTI Identifier:
15011263
Report Number(s):
BNL-73672-2005-CP
R&D Project: 13773; KP1301020; TRN: US0500931
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: WM '04 CONFERENCE, TUCSON, AZ (US), 02/29/2004--03/04/2004; Other Information: PBD: 1 Mar 2004
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACTINIDES; BASIC INTERACTIONS; CLEANING; GROUTING; LEACHING; NSLS; PHOTON BEAMS; RADIOISOTOPES; REMOVAL; SOILS; SOLUBILITY; SYNCHROTRONS; TANKS; URANIUM; WASTES; WIPP

Citation Formats

FITTS,J.P., KALB,P.D., FRANCIS,A.J., FUHRMANN,M., DODGE,C.J., and GILLOW,J.B.. ENVIROSUITE: USING STATE-OF-THE-ART SYNCHROTRON TECHNIQUES TO UNDERSTAND ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION SCIENCE ISSUES AT THE MOLECULAR LEVEL.. United States: N. p., 2004. Web.
FITTS,J.P., KALB,P.D., FRANCIS,A.J., FUHRMANN,M., DODGE,C.J., & GILLOW,J.B.. ENVIROSUITE: USING STATE-OF-THE-ART SYNCHROTRON TECHNIQUES TO UNDERSTAND ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION SCIENCE ISSUES AT THE MOLECULAR LEVEL.. United States.
FITTS,J.P., KALB,P.D., FRANCIS,A.J., FUHRMANN,M., DODGE,C.J., and GILLOW,J.B.. Mon . "ENVIROSUITE: USING STATE-OF-THE-ART SYNCHROTRON TECHNIQUES TO UNDERSTAND ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION SCIENCE ISSUES AT THE MOLECULAR LEVEL.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/15011263.
@article{osti_15011263,
title = {ENVIROSUITE: USING STATE-OF-THE-ART SYNCHROTRON TECHNIQUES TO UNDERSTAND ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION SCIENCE ISSUES AT THE MOLECULAR LEVEL.},
author = {FITTS,J.P. and KALB,P.D. and FRANCIS,A.J. and FUHRMANN,M. and DODGE,C.J. and GILLOW,J.B.},
abstractNote = {Although DOE's Environmental Management program has made steady progress in cleaning up environmental legacies throughout the DOE complex, there are still significant remediation issues that remain to be solved. For example, DOE faces difficult challenges related to potential mobilization of radionuclides (e.g., actinides) and other hazardous contaminants in soils, removal and final treatment of high-level waste and residuals from leaking tanks, and the long-term stewardship of remediated sites and engineered disposal facilities, to name just a few. In some cases, new technologies and technology applications will be required based on current engineering expertise. In others, however, basic scientific research is needed to understand the mechanisms of how contaminants behave under specific conditions and how they interact with the environment, from which new engineering solutions can emerge. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Stony Brook University, scientists have teamed to use state-of-the-art synchrotron techniques to help understand the basic interactions of contaminants in the environment. Much of this work is conducted at the BNL National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), which is a user facility that provides high energy X-ray and ultraviolet photon beams to facilitate the examination of contaminants and materials at the molecular level. These studies allow us to determine how chemical speciation and structure control important parameters such as solubility, which in turn drive critical performance characteristics such as leaching. In one study for example, we are examining the effects of microbial activity on actinide contaminants under conditions anticipated at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. One possible outcome of this research is the identification of specific microbes that can trap uranium or other contaminants within the intracellular structure and help mitigate mobility. In another study, we are exploring the interaction of contaminants with soil and plant roots to better understand the mechanisms responsible for uptake. This effort will lead to improvements in phytoremediation, an innovative and cost-effective approach to the cleanup of large volumes of soil with low concentrations of contaminants. In a third effort, we are investigating molecular interactions of contaminants in high-level waste tanks with potential grouting materials for remediation of the West Valley, NY site to assess their suitability and long-term performance.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2004},
month = {Mon Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2004}
}

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