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Title: Recessed Lighting in the Limelight

Abstract

Recessed downlights are among the most popular installed lighting fixtures for new and remodeled homes. DOE estimates there are at least 350 million currently installed in US homes, and around 20 million are sold each year. A recent California study showed only 0.4 percent of recessed cans used compact fluorescent lamps. Annual reported sales of fluorescent residential recessed downlights nationwide make up no more than three percent of total residential recessed downlight sales. Standard recessed downlights waste energy by leaking conditioned air to unconditioned attic space, and using less efficient, high-heat incandescent bulbs. 33 states have adopted building codes that require recessed cans installed in the building shell to be airtight. To encourage lighting fixture manufacturers to bring to market high-efficiency air-tight recessed cans, DOE is sponsoring the recessed downlights project. PNNL solicited bids for energy efficient recessed downlights meeting the following specifications: They must use pin-based CFLs, have an airtight housing, be IC-rated, use electronic ballasts, and have a light output minimum of 900 initial lumens. PNNL did short- and long-term testing of the submitted lamps and negotiated lower prices for consumer purchase of qualifying models.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
15010517
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-40522
BT0303000
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Home Energy, 21(1):12-13
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Home Energy, 21(1):12-13
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; energy efficiency; DOE Emerging Technologies Program; market transformation; lighting; CFLs; subcompact fluorescents

Citation Formats

Gordon, Kelly L, and McCullough, Jeffrey J. Recessed Lighting in the Limelight. United States: N. p., 2003. Web.
Gordon, Kelly L, & McCullough, Jeffrey J. Recessed Lighting in the Limelight. United States.
Gordon, Kelly L, and McCullough, Jeffrey J. 2003. "Recessed Lighting in the Limelight". United States.
@article{osti_15010517,
title = {Recessed Lighting in the Limelight},
author = {Gordon, Kelly L and McCullough, Jeffrey J},
abstractNote = {Recessed downlights are among the most popular installed lighting fixtures for new and remodeled homes. DOE estimates there are at least 350 million currently installed in US homes, and around 20 million are sold each year. A recent California study showed only 0.4 percent of recessed cans used compact fluorescent lamps. Annual reported sales of fluorescent residential recessed downlights nationwide make up no more than three percent of total residential recessed downlight sales. Standard recessed downlights waste energy by leaking conditioned air to unconditioned attic space, and using less efficient, high-heat incandescent bulbs. 33 states have adopted building codes that require recessed cans installed in the building shell to be airtight. To encourage lighting fixture manufacturers to bring to market high-efficiency air-tight recessed cans, DOE is sponsoring the recessed downlights project. PNNL solicited bids for energy efficient recessed downlights meeting the following specifications: They must use pin-based CFLs, have an airtight housing, be IC-rated, use electronic ballasts, and have a light output minimum of 900 initial lumens. PNNL did short- and long-term testing of the submitted lamps and negotiated lower prices for consumer purchase of qualifying models.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/15010517}, journal = {Home Energy, 21(1):12-13},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2003},
month = {2}
}