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Title: Computation Directorate and Science& Technology Review Computational Science and Research Featured in 2002

Abstract

Thank you for your interest in the activities of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Computation Directorate. This collection of articles from the Laboratory's Science & Technology Review highlights the most significant computational projects, achievements, and contributions during 2002. In 2002, LLNL marked the 50th anniversary of its founding. Scientific advancement in support of our national security mission has always been the core of the Laboratory. So that researchers could better under and predict complex physical phenomena, the Laboratory has pushed the limits of the largest, fastest, most powerful computers in the world. In the late 1950's, Edward Teller--one of the LLNL founders--proposed that the Laboratory commission a Livermore Advanced Research Computer (LARC) built to Livermore's specifications. He tells the story of being in Washington, DC, when John Von Neumann asked to talk about the LARC. He thought Teller wanted too much memory in the machine. (The specifications called for 20-30,000 words.) Teller was too smart to argue with him. Later Teller invited Von Neumann to the Laboratory and showed him one of the design codes being prepared for the LARC. He asked Von Neumann for suggestions on fitting the code into 10,000 words of memory, and flattered him about ''Labbies''more » not being smart enough to figure it out. Von Neumann dropped his objections, and the LARC arrived with 30,000 words of memory. Memory, and how close memory is to the processor, is still of interest to us today. Livermore's first supercomputer was the Remington-Rand Univac-1. It had 5600 vacuum tubes and was 2 meters wide by 4 meters long. This machine was commonly referred to as a 1 KFlop machine [E+3]. Skip ahead 50 years. The ASCI White machine at the Laboratory today, produced by IBM, is rated at a peak performance of 12.3 TFlops or E+13. We've improved computer processing power by 10 orders of magnitude in 50 years, and I do not believe there's any reason to think we won't improve another 10 orders of magnitude in the next 50 years. For years I have heard talk of hitting the physical limits of Moore's Law, but new technologies will take us into the next phase of computer processing power such as 3-D chips, molecular computing, quantum computing, and more. Big computers are icons or symbols of the culture and larger infrastructure that exists at LLNL to guide scientific discovery and engineering development. We have dealt with balance issues for 50 years and will continue to do so in our quest for a digital proxy of the properties of matter at extremely high temperatures and pressures. I believe that the next big computational win will be the merger of high-performance computing with information management. We already create terabytes--soon to be petabytes--of data. Efficiently storing, finding, visualizing and extracting data and turning that into knowledge which aids decision-making and scientific discovery is an exciting challenge. In the meantime, please enjoy this retrospective on computational physics, computer science, advanced software technologies, and applied mathematics performed by programs and researchers at LLNL during 2002. It offers a glimpse into the stimulating world of computational science in support of the national missions and homeland defense.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
15008028
Report Number(s):
UCRL-ID-152500
TRN: US200425%%77
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 4 Apr 2003
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COMPUTERS; DECISION MAKING; DESIGN; MANAGEMENT; METERS; NATIONAL SECURITY; PERFORMANCE; PHYSICS; PROCESSING; SPECIFICATIONS; SUPERCOMPUTERS

Citation Formats

Alchorn, A L. Computation Directorate and Science& Technology Review Computational Science and Research Featured in 2002. United States: N. p., 2003. Web. doi:10.2172/15008028.
Alchorn, A L. Computation Directorate and Science& Technology Review Computational Science and Research Featured in 2002. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/15008028
Alchorn, A L. Fri . "Computation Directorate and Science& Technology Review Computational Science and Research Featured in 2002". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/15008028. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/15008028.
@article{osti_15008028,
title = {Computation Directorate and Science& Technology Review Computational Science and Research Featured in 2002},
author = {Alchorn, A L},
abstractNote = {Thank you for your interest in the activities of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Computation Directorate. This collection of articles from the Laboratory's Science & Technology Review highlights the most significant computational projects, achievements, and contributions during 2002. In 2002, LLNL marked the 50th anniversary of its founding. Scientific advancement in support of our national security mission has always been the core of the Laboratory. So that researchers could better under and predict complex physical phenomena, the Laboratory has pushed the limits of the largest, fastest, most powerful computers in the world. In the late 1950's, Edward Teller--one of the LLNL founders--proposed that the Laboratory commission a Livermore Advanced Research Computer (LARC) built to Livermore's specifications. He tells the story of being in Washington, DC, when John Von Neumann asked to talk about the LARC. He thought Teller wanted too much memory in the machine. (The specifications called for 20-30,000 words.) Teller was too smart to argue with him. Later Teller invited Von Neumann to the Laboratory and showed him one of the design codes being prepared for the LARC. He asked Von Neumann for suggestions on fitting the code into 10,000 words of memory, and flattered him about ''Labbies'' not being smart enough to figure it out. Von Neumann dropped his objections, and the LARC arrived with 30,000 words of memory. Memory, and how close memory is to the processor, is still of interest to us today. Livermore's first supercomputer was the Remington-Rand Univac-1. It had 5600 vacuum tubes and was 2 meters wide by 4 meters long. This machine was commonly referred to as a 1 KFlop machine [E+3]. Skip ahead 50 years. The ASCI White machine at the Laboratory today, produced by IBM, is rated at a peak performance of 12.3 TFlops or E+13. We've improved computer processing power by 10 orders of magnitude in 50 years, and I do not believe there's any reason to think we won't improve another 10 orders of magnitude in the next 50 years. For years I have heard talk of hitting the physical limits of Moore's Law, but new technologies will take us into the next phase of computer processing power such as 3-D chips, molecular computing, quantum computing, and more. Big computers are icons or symbols of the culture and larger infrastructure that exists at LLNL to guide scientific discovery and engineering development. We have dealt with balance issues for 50 years and will continue to do so in our quest for a digital proxy of the properties of matter at extremely high temperatures and pressures. I believe that the next big computational win will be the merger of high-performance computing with information management. We already create terabytes--soon to be petabytes--of data. Efficiently storing, finding, visualizing and extracting data and turning that into knowledge which aids decision-making and scientific discovery is an exciting challenge. In the meantime, please enjoy this retrospective on computational physics, computer science, advanced software technologies, and applied mathematics performed by programs and researchers at LLNL during 2002. It offers a glimpse into the stimulating world of computational science in support of the national missions and homeland defense.},
doi = {10.2172/15008028},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/15008028}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2003},
month = {4}
}