skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Application of the Colloidal Borescope to Determine a Complex Groundwater Flow Pattern

Abstract

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory made in situ flow measurements in groundwater monitoring wells at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to determine the flow direction in an aquifer with a flat water table. Given the total errors in water level elevations, flow directions based on the potentiometric surface are ambiguous at best. The colloidal borescope was used because it allows direct, real time observation of mobile colloidal particles in the open interval of a water well and thus, avoids the use of water level data. The results characterize a complex groundwater flow pattern under several buried waste storage tank farms. The aquifer, artificially high due to large volume liquid discharges to the soil column from Hanford's nuclear production era, is currently receding to original conditions. The aquifer lies in unconsolidated gravel beds overlying an impermeable basalt surface that has a plucked, flood-scoured, scabland structure. The current aquifer thickness is similar to the relief on the basalt basement. Thus the groundwater must flow around the impermeable basalt structures producing a complicated flow pattern under the waste storage unit. The original monitoring network was designed for northwest flow when the water table was held artificially high. Proper locations for newmore » wells are dependent on our knowledge of the flow direction. The results of the colloidal borescope investigation agree with the southerly direction indicated from hydrographs, contaminant trends, other direct flow data and the general concept of a receding aquifer draining off the southern limb of a basalt anticline. Flow in the aquifer is diverted by irregular local structural highs of very low permeability basalt.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
15007572
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-34478
EY3542301
DOE Contract Number:  
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Evaluation and Remediation of Low Permeability and Dual Porosity Environments. Symposium on Evaluation and Remediation of Low Permeability and Dual Porosity Environments (2001 : Reno, Nev.), STP 1415(176-190; ASTM ,West Conshohocken,,United States.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES

Citation Formats

Narbutovskih, Susan M., McDonald, John P., Schalla, Ronald, Sweeney, Mark D., and M.N. Sara and L.G. Everett. Application of the Colloidal Borescope to Determine a Complex Groundwater Flow Pattern. United States: N. p., 2002. Web.
Narbutovskih, Susan M., McDonald, John P., Schalla, Ronald, Sweeney, Mark D., & M.N. Sara and L.G. Everett. Application of the Colloidal Borescope to Determine a Complex Groundwater Flow Pattern. United States.
Narbutovskih, Susan M., McDonald, John P., Schalla, Ronald, Sweeney, Mark D., and M.N. Sara and L.G. Everett. Tue . "Application of the Colloidal Borescope to Determine a Complex Groundwater Flow Pattern". United States.
@article{osti_15007572,
title = {Application of the Colloidal Borescope to Determine a Complex Groundwater Flow Pattern},
author = {Narbutovskih, Susan M. and McDonald, John P. and Schalla, Ronald and Sweeney, Mark D. and M.N. Sara and L.G. Everett},
abstractNote = {Pacific Northwest National Laboratory made in situ flow measurements in groundwater monitoring wells at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to determine the flow direction in an aquifer with a flat water table. Given the total errors in water level elevations, flow directions based on the potentiometric surface are ambiguous at best. The colloidal borescope was used because it allows direct, real time observation of mobile colloidal particles in the open interval of a water well and thus, avoids the use of water level data. The results characterize a complex groundwater flow pattern under several buried waste storage tank farms. The aquifer, artificially high due to large volume liquid discharges to the soil column from Hanford's nuclear production era, is currently receding to original conditions. The aquifer lies in unconsolidated gravel beds overlying an impermeable basalt surface that has a plucked, flood-scoured, scabland structure. The current aquifer thickness is similar to the relief on the basalt basement. Thus the groundwater must flow around the impermeable basalt structures producing a complicated flow pattern under the waste storage unit. The original monitoring network was designed for northwest flow when the water table was held artificially high. Proper locations for new wells are dependent on our knowledge of the flow direction. The results of the colloidal borescope investigation agree with the southerly direction indicated from hydrographs, contaminant trends, other direct flow data and the general concept of a receding aquifer draining off the southern limb of a basalt anticline. Flow in the aquifer is diverted by irregular local structural highs of very low permeability basalt.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2002},
month = {10}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: