skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report April-June 1999, volume 9, number 3

Abstract

This issue has articles from a diverse range of subjects pertaining to execution of experiments on the National Ignition Facility. The first article looks at the issue of operability of the NIF target chamber from the perspective of emissions of target debris and shrapnel. Damage to chamber optics by such target emissions directly or through seeding of laser damage is likely to be a major driver for NIF operating costs. It is essential that we are able to minimize the impact of such debris. This article reviews our current understanding of target-generated debris and shrapnel and recommends limits on total target and shrapnel mass for NIF target designs. The second article reviews experiment designs and diagnostic techniques that can be used for x-ray radiography in laser-plasma experiments. Techniques that have been used successfully at Nova and other laser facilities are described, and the problems with scaling them to the much higher energy plasmas of NIF are discussed. These problems include greater stand-off of diagnostics at NIF as well as higher energy requirements in the beams used to heat the backlighting plasma. Alternate diagnostic techniques that are applicable to NIF are described along with the results of tests at OMEGA. Themore » third article is a review of the application of large laser facilities such as NIF to the field of laboratory astrophysics. In past-experiments at Nova and ongoing work at OMEGA and other facilities, intense lasers are being used to re-create aspects of astrophysical phenomena in the laboratory, allowing the creation of experimental testbeds where theory and modeling can be quantitatively compared with data. The final two articles review experiments conducted on the OMEGA and Nova laser facilities to study the characteristics and applications of supersonic radiation wave transport in low-density foams. In ongoing OMEGA experiments, studies of supersonic radiation transport over several radiation mean free paths are beginning to enhance significantly our understanding of the details of how radiation and matter interact with one another in contexts relevant both to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and to other applications. The first of these two articles describes these experiments. The second one describes the application of such radiative heating techniques to development of a ''piston'' for shocklessly accelerating materials. This new experimental technique, first developed on Nova, shows promise as a way to diagnose the development of acceleration-driven hydrodynamic instabilities in the compressible regime, a longstanding ICF problem that is currently only poorly understood.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
15007219
Report Number(s):
UCRL-LR-105821-99-3
TRN: US0401475
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ASTROPHYSICS; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; HEATING; HYDRODYNAMICS; INERTIAL CONFINEMENT; LASERS; MEAN FREE PATH; OPERATING COST; OPTICS; RADIATION TRANSPORT; RADIATIONS; SIMULATION; TARGET CHAMBERS; US NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY; X-RAY RADIOGRAPHY

Citation Formats

MacGowan, B. Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report April-June 1999, volume 9, number 3. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.2172/15007219.
MacGowan, B. Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report April-June 1999, volume 9, number 3. United States. doi:10.2172/15007219.
MacGowan, B. Tue . "Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report April-June 1999, volume 9, number 3". United States. doi:10.2172/15007219. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/15007219.
@article{osti_15007219,
title = {Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report April-June 1999, volume 9, number 3},
author = {MacGowan, B},
abstractNote = {This issue has articles from a diverse range of subjects pertaining to execution of experiments on the National Ignition Facility. The first article looks at the issue of operability of the NIF target chamber from the perspective of emissions of target debris and shrapnel. Damage to chamber optics by such target emissions directly or through seeding of laser damage is likely to be a major driver for NIF operating costs. It is essential that we are able to minimize the impact of such debris. This article reviews our current understanding of target-generated debris and shrapnel and recommends limits on total target and shrapnel mass for NIF target designs. The second article reviews experiment designs and diagnostic techniques that can be used for x-ray radiography in laser-plasma experiments. Techniques that have been used successfully at Nova and other laser facilities are described, and the problems with scaling them to the much higher energy plasmas of NIF are discussed. These problems include greater stand-off of diagnostics at NIF as well as higher energy requirements in the beams used to heat the backlighting plasma. Alternate diagnostic techniques that are applicable to NIF are described along with the results of tests at OMEGA. The third article is a review of the application of large laser facilities such as NIF to the field of laboratory astrophysics. In past-experiments at Nova and ongoing work at OMEGA and other facilities, intense lasers are being used to re-create aspects of astrophysical phenomena in the laboratory, allowing the creation of experimental testbeds where theory and modeling can be quantitatively compared with data. The final two articles review experiments conducted on the OMEGA and Nova laser facilities to study the characteristics and applications of supersonic radiation wave transport in low-density foams. In ongoing OMEGA experiments, studies of supersonic radiation transport over several radiation mean free paths are beginning to enhance significantly our understanding of the details of how radiation and matter interact with one another in contexts relevant both to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and to other applications. The first of these two articles describes these experiments. The second one describes the application of such radiative heating techniques to development of a ''piston'' for shocklessly accelerating materials. This new experimental technique, first developed on Nova, shows promise as a way to diagnose the development of acceleration-driven hydrodynamic instabilities in the compressible regime, a longstanding ICF problem that is currently only poorly understood.},
doi = {10.2172/15007219},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {6}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: