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Title: 600 eV falcon-linac thomson x-ray source

Abstract

The advent of 3rd generation light sources such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBL, and the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne, have produced a revolution in x-ray probing of dense matter during the past decade. These machines use electron-synchrotrons in conjunction with undulator stages to produce 100 psec x-ray pulses with photon energies of several kiloelectronvolts (keV). The applications for x-ray probing of matter are numerous and diverse with experiments in medicine and biology, semiconductors and materials science, and plasma and solid state physics. In spite of the success of the 3rd generation light sources there is strong motivation to push the capabilities of x-ray probing into new realms, requiring shorter pulses, higher brightness and harder x-rays. A 4th generation light source, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), is being considered at the Stanford Linear Accelerator [1]. The LCLS will produce multi-kilovolt x-rays of subpicosecond duration that are 10 orders of magnitude brighter than today's 3rd generation light sources.[1] Although the LCLS will provide unprecedented capability for performing time-resolved x-ray probing of ultrafast phenomena at solid densities, this machine will not be completed for many years. In the meantime there is a serious need for an ultrashort-pulse, high-brightness,more » hard x-ray source that is capable of probing deep into high-Z solid materials to measure dynamic effects that occur on picosecond time scales. Such an instrument would be ideal for probing the effects of shock propagation in solids using Bragg and Laue diffraction. These techniques can be used to look at phase transitions, melting and recrystallization, and the propagation of defects and dislocations well below the surface in solid materials. [2] These types of dynamic phenomena undermine the mechanical properties of metals and are of general interest in solid state physics, materials science, metallurgy, and have specific relevance to stockpile stewardship. Another x-ray diagnostic technique, extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, can be used to measure small-scale structural changes to understand the underlying atomic physics associated with the formation of defects. [2]« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
15006523
Report Number(s):
UCRL-ID-141613
TRN: US0400844
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 15 Dec 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE; ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE; ATOMIC PHYSICS; BRIGHTNESS; DEFECTS; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; FINE STRUCTURE; LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY; LIGHT SOURCES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; PHOTONS; SOLID STATE PHYSICS; WIGGLER MAGNETS; X-RAY SOURCES

Citation Formats

Crane, J K, LeSage, G P, Ditmire, T, Cross, R, Wharton, K, Moffitt, K, Cowan, T E, Hays, G, Tsai, V, Anderson, G, Shuttlesworth, R, and Springer, P. 600 eV falcon-linac thomson x-ray source. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/15006523.
Crane, J K, LeSage, G P, Ditmire, T, Cross, R, Wharton, K, Moffitt, K, Cowan, T E, Hays, G, Tsai, V, Anderson, G, Shuttlesworth, R, & Springer, P. 600 eV falcon-linac thomson x-ray source. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/15006523
Crane, J K, LeSage, G P, Ditmire, T, Cross, R, Wharton, K, Moffitt, K, Cowan, T E, Hays, G, Tsai, V, Anderson, G, Shuttlesworth, R, and Springer, P. Fri . "600 eV falcon-linac thomson x-ray source". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/15006523. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/15006523.
@article{osti_15006523,
title = {600 eV falcon-linac thomson x-ray source},
author = {Crane, J K and LeSage, G P and Ditmire, T and Cross, R and Wharton, K and Moffitt, K and Cowan, T E and Hays, G and Tsai, V and Anderson, G and Shuttlesworth, R and Springer, P},
abstractNote = {The advent of 3rd generation light sources such as the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBL, and the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne, have produced a revolution in x-ray probing of dense matter during the past decade. These machines use electron-synchrotrons in conjunction with undulator stages to produce 100 psec x-ray pulses with photon energies of several kiloelectronvolts (keV). The applications for x-ray probing of matter are numerous and diverse with experiments in medicine and biology, semiconductors and materials science, and plasma and solid state physics. In spite of the success of the 3rd generation light sources there is strong motivation to push the capabilities of x-ray probing into new realms, requiring shorter pulses, higher brightness and harder x-rays. A 4th generation light source, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), is being considered at the Stanford Linear Accelerator [1]. The LCLS will produce multi-kilovolt x-rays of subpicosecond duration that are 10 orders of magnitude brighter than today's 3rd generation light sources.[1] Although the LCLS will provide unprecedented capability for performing time-resolved x-ray probing of ultrafast phenomena at solid densities, this machine will not be completed for many years. In the meantime there is a serious need for an ultrashort-pulse, high-brightness, hard x-ray source that is capable of probing deep into high-Z solid materials to measure dynamic effects that occur on picosecond time scales. Such an instrument would be ideal for probing the effects of shock propagation in solids using Bragg and Laue diffraction. These techniques can be used to look at phase transitions, melting and recrystallization, and the propagation of defects and dislocations well below the surface in solid materials. [2] These types of dynamic phenomena undermine the mechanical properties of metals and are of general interest in solid state physics, materials science, metallurgy, and have specific relevance to stockpile stewardship. Another x-ray diagnostic technique, extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, can be used to measure small-scale structural changes to understand the underlying atomic physics associated with the formation of defects. [2]},
doi = {10.2172/15006523},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/15006523}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {12}
}