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Title: Advanced Wavefront Control Techniques

Abstract

Programs at LLNL that involve large laser systems--ranging from the National Ignition Facility to new tactical laser weapons--depend on the maintenance of laser beam quality through precise control of the optical wavefront. This can be accomplished using adaptive optics, which compensate for time-varying aberrations that are often caused by heating in a high-power laser system. Over the past two decades, LLNL has developed a broad capability in adaptive optics technology for both laser beam control and high-resolution imaging. This adaptive optics capability has been based on thin deformable glass mirrors with individual ceramic actuators bonded to the back. In the case of high-power lasers, these adaptive optics systems have successfully improved beam quality. However, as we continue to extend our applications requirements, the existing technology base for wavefront control cannot satisfy them. To address this issue, this project studied improved modeling tools to increase our detailed understanding of the performance of these systems, and evaluated novel approaches to low-order wavefront control that offer the possibility of reduced cost and complexity. We also investigated improved beam control technology for high-resolution wavefront control. Many high-power laser systems suffer from high-spatial-frequency aberrations that require control of hundreds or thousands of phase points tomore » provide adequate correction. However, the cost and size of current deformable mirrors can become prohibitive for applications requiring more than a few tens of phase control points. New phase control technologies are becoming available which offer control of many phase points with small low-cost devices. The goal of this project was to expand our wavefront control capabilities with improved modeling tools, new devices that reduce system cost and complexity, and extensions to high spatial and temporal frequencies using new adaptive optics technologies. In FY 99, the second year of this project, work was performed in four areas (1) advanced modeling tools for deformable mirrors (2) low-order wavefront correctors with Alvarez lenses, (3) a direct phase measuring heterdyne wavefront sensor, and (4) high-spatial-frequency wavefront control using spatial light modulators.« less

Authors:
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Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
15006443
Report Number(s):
UCRL-ID-142553
TRN: US200411%%81
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 21 Feb 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ACTUATORS; CERAMICS; GLASS; HEATING; LASERS; LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY; LENSES; MAINTENANCE; MIRRORS; OPTICS; PERFORMANCE; SIMULATION; US NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

Citation Formats

Olivier, S S, Brase, J M, Avicola, K, Thompson, C A, Kartz, M W, Winters, S, Hartley, R, Wihelmsen, J, Dowla, F V, Carrano, C J, Bauman, B J, Pennington, D M, Lande, D, Sawvel, R M, Silva, D A, Cooke, J B, and Brown, C G. Advanced Wavefront Control Techniques. United States: N. p., 2001. Web. doi:10.2172/15006443.
Olivier, S S, Brase, J M, Avicola, K, Thompson, C A, Kartz, M W, Winters, S, Hartley, R, Wihelmsen, J, Dowla, F V, Carrano, C J, Bauman, B J, Pennington, D M, Lande, D, Sawvel, R M, Silva, D A, Cooke, J B, & Brown, C G. Advanced Wavefront Control Techniques. United States. doi:10.2172/15006443.
Olivier, S S, Brase, J M, Avicola, K, Thompson, C A, Kartz, M W, Winters, S, Hartley, R, Wihelmsen, J, Dowla, F V, Carrano, C J, Bauman, B J, Pennington, D M, Lande, D, Sawvel, R M, Silva, D A, Cooke, J B, and Brown, C G. Wed . "Advanced Wavefront Control Techniques". United States. doi:10.2172/15006443. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/15006443.
@article{osti_15006443,
title = {Advanced Wavefront Control Techniques},
author = {Olivier, S S and Brase, J M and Avicola, K and Thompson, C A and Kartz, M W and Winters, S and Hartley, R and Wihelmsen, J and Dowla, F V and Carrano, C J and Bauman, B J and Pennington, D M and Lande, D and Sawvel, R M and Silva, D A and Cooke, J B and Brown, C G},
abstractNote = {Programs at LLNL that involve large laser systems--ranging from the National Ignition Facility to new tactical laser weapons--depend on the maintenance of laser beam quality through precise control of the optical wavefront. This can be accomplished using adaptive optics, which compensate for time-varying aberrations that are often caused by heating in a high-power laser system. Over the past two decades, LLNL has developed a broad capability in adaptive optics technology for both laser beam control and high-resolution imaging. This adaptive optics capability has been based on thin deformable glass mirrors with individual ceramic actuators bonded to the back. In the case of high-power lasers, these adaptive optics systems have successfully improved beam quality. However, as we continue to extend our applications requirements, the existing technology base for wavefront control cannot satisfy them. To address this issue, this project studied improved modeling tools to increase our detailed understanding of the performance of these systems, and evaluated novel approaches to low-order wavefront control that offer the possibility of reduced cost and complexity. We also investigated improved beam control technology for high-resolution wavefront control. Many high-power laser systems suffer from high-spatial-frequency aberrations that require control of hundreds or thousands of phase points to provide adequate correction. However, the cost and size of current deformable mirrors can become prohibitive for applications requiring more than a few tens of phase control points. New phase control technologies are becoming available which offer control of many phase points with small low-cost devices. The goal of this project was to expand our wavefront control capabilities with improved modeling tools, new devices that reduce system cost and complexity, and extensions to high spatial and temporal frequencies using new adaptive optics technologies. In FY 99, the second year of this project, work was performed in four areas (1) advanced modeling tools for deformable mirrors (2) low-order wavefront correctors with Alvarez lenses, (3) a direct phase measuring heterdyne wavefront sensor, and (4) high-spatial-frequency wavefront control using spatial light modulators.},
doi = {10.2172/15006443},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2001},
month = {2}
}

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