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Title: Staged Repository Development Programmes

Abstract

Programs to manage and ultimately dispose of high-level radioactive wastes are unique from scientific and technological as well as socio-political aspects. From a scientific and technological perspective, high-level radioactive wastes remain potentially hazardous for geological time periods-many millennia-and scientific and technological programs must be put in place that result in a system that provides high confidence that the wastes will be isolated from the accessible environment for these many thousands of years. Of course, ''proof'' in the classical sense is not possible at the outset, since the performance of the system can only be known with assurance, if ever, after the waste has been emplaced for those geological time periods. Adding to this challenge, many uncertainties exist in both the natural and engineered systems that are intended to isolate the wastes, and some of the uncertainties will remain regardless of the time and expense in attempting to characterize the system and assess its performance. What was perhaps underappreciated in the early days of waste management and repository program development were the unique and intense reactions that the institutional, political, and public bodies would have to repository program development, particularly in programs attempting to identify and then select sites for characterization,more » design, licensing, and ultimate development. Reactions in most nations were strong, focused, unrelenting, and often successful in hindering, derailing, and even stopping national repository programs. The reasons for such reactions and the measures to successfully respond to them are still evolving and continue to be the focus of many national program and political leaders. Adaptive Staging suggests an approach to repository program development that reflects the unique challenges associated with the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The step-wise, incremental, learn-as-you-go approach is intended to maximize the probability of program success, including a redefinition of what success means. The key objective is to come to broad agreement on a program approach that will result in a suitable repository, performing better than required, with the flexibility to adapt to experience and be prepared to change or even reverse direction if conditions merit. The step-wise and transparent approach is intended to foster implementer and regulator behavior that earns the trust and confidence of the many diverse stakeholders and the public by proceeding in a manner that makes it clear that the program is striving to meet their needs and fully address their concerns.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
15005412
Report Number(s):
UCRL-TR-155573
TRN: US0305373
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Oct 2003
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; RADIOACTIVE WASTE FACILITIES; DESIGN; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; LICENSING; PERFORMANCE; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; PUBLIC ANXIETY; PLANNING

Citation Formats

Isaacs, T. Staged Repository Development Programmes. United States: N. p., 2003. Web. doi:10.2172/15005412.
Isaacs, T. Staged Repository Development Programmes. United States. doi:10.2172/15005412.
Isaacs, T. Wed . "Staged Repository Development Programmes". United States. doi:10.2172/15005412. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/15005412.
@article{osti_15005412,
title = {Staged Repository Development Programmes},
author = {Isaacs, T},
abstractNote = {Programs to manage and ultimately dispose of high-level radioactive wastes are unique from scientific and technological as well as socio-political aspects. From a scientific and technological perspective, high-level radioactive wastes remain potentially hazardous for geological time periods-many millennia-and scientific and technological programs must be put in place that result in a system that provides high confidence that the wastes will be isolated from the accessible environment for these many thousands of years. Of course, ''proof'' in the classical sense is not possible at the outset, since the performance of the system can only be known with assurance, if ever, after the waste has been emplaced for those geological time periods. Adding to this challenge, many uncertainties exist in both the natural and engineered systems that are intended to isolate the wastes, and some of the uncertainties will remain regardless of the time and expense in attempting to characterize the system and assess its performance. What was perhaps underappreciated in the early days of waste management and repository program development were the unique and intense reactions that the institutional, political, and public bodies would have to repository program development, particularly in programs attempting to identify and then select sites for characterization, design, licensing, and ultimate development. Reactions in most nations were strong, focused, unrelenting, and often successful in hindering, derailing, and even stopping national repository programs. The reasons for such reactions and the measures to successfully respond to them are still evolving and continue to be the focus of many national program and political leaders. Adaptive Staging suggests an approach to repository program development that reflects the unique challenges associated with the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The step-wise, incremental, learn-as-you-go approach is intended to maximize the probability of program success, including a redefinition of what success means. The key objective is to come to broad agreement on a program approach that will result in a suitable repository, performing better than required, with the flexibility to adapt to experience and be prepared to change or even reverse direction if conditions merit. The step-wise and transparent approach is intended to foster implementer and regulator behavior that earns the trust and confidence of the many diverse stakeholders and the public by proceeding in a manner that makes it clear that the program is striving to meet their needs and fully address their concerns.},
doi = {10.2172/15005412},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2003},
month = {10}
}

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