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Title: NIF Anti-Reflective Coating Solutions: Preparation, Procedures and Specifications

Abstract

The following document contains a detailed description of the preparation procedures for the antireflective coating solutions used for NIF optics. This memo includes preparation procedures for the coating solutions (sections 2.0-4.0), specifications and vendor information of the raw materials used and on all equipment used (section 5.0), and QA specifications (section 6.0) and procedures (section 7.0) to determine quality and repeatability of all the coating solutions. There are different five coating solutions that will be used to coat NIF optics. These solutions are listed below: (1) Colloidal silica (3%) in ethanol (2) Colloidal silica (2%) in sec-butanol (3) Colloidal silica (9%) in sec-butanol (deammoniated) (4) HMDS treated silica (10%) in decane (5) GR650 (3.3%) in ethanol/sec-butanol The names listed above are to be considered the official name for the solution. They will be referred to by these names in the remainder of this document. Table 1 gives a summary of all the optics to be coated including: (1) the surface to be coated; (2) the type of solution to be used; (3) the coating method (meniscus, dip, or spin coating) to be used; (4) the type of coating (broadband, 1?, 2?, 3?) to be made; (5) number of optics tomore » be coated; and (6) the type of post processing required (if any). Table 2 gives a summary of the batch compositions and measured properties of all five of these solutions.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
15005259
Report Number(s):
UCRL-ID-154626
TRN: US0305348
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jul 2003
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; US NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY; ANTIREFLECTION COATINGS; FABRICATION; OPTICS; SILICA; SPECIFICATIONS; SOLVENTS; SURFACE COATING

Citation Formats

Suratwala, T, Carman, L, and Thomas, I. NIF Anti-Reflective Coating Solutions: Preparation, Procedures and Specifications. United States: N. p., 2003. Web. doi:10.2172/15005259.
Suratwala, T, Carman, L, & Thomas, I. NIF Anti-Reflective Coating Solutions: Preparation, Procedures and Specifications. United States. doi:10.2172/15005259.
Suratwala, T, Carman, L, and Thomas, I. Tue . "NIF Anti-Reflective Coating Solutions: Preparation, Procedures and Specifications". United States. doi:10.2172/15005259. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/15005259.
@article{osti_15005259,
title = {NIF Anti-Reflective Coating Solutions: Preparation, Procedures and Specifications},
author = {Suratwala, T and Carman, L and Thomas, I},
abstractNote = {The following document contains a detailed description of the preparation procedures for the antireflective coating solutions used for NIF optics. This memo includes preparation procedures for the coating solutions (sections 2.0-4.0), specifications and vendor information of the raw materials used and on all equipment used (section 5.0), and QA specifications (section 6.0) and procedures (section 7.0) to determine quality and repeatability of all the coating solutions. There are different five coating solutions that will be used to coat NIF optics. These solutions are listed below: (1) Colloidal silica (3%) in ethanol (2) Colloidal silica (2%) in sec-butanol (3) Colloidal silica (9%) in sec-butanol (deammoniated) (4) HMDS treated silica (10%) in decane (5) GR650 (3.3%) in ethanol/sec-butanol The names listed above are to be considered the official name for the solution. They will be referred to by these names in the remainder of this document. Table 1 gives a summary of all the optics to be coated including: (1) the surface to be coated; (2) the type of solution to be used; (3) the coating method (meniscus, dip, or spin coating) to be used; (4) the type of coating (broadband, 1?, 2?, 3?) to be made; (5) number of optics to be coated; and (6) the type of post processing required (if any). Table 2 gives a summary of the batch compositions and measured properties of all five of these solutions.},
doi = {10.2172/15005259},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2003},
month = {Tue Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2003}
}

Technical Report:

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